Agassiz


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Related to Agassiz: Lake Agassiz

Agassiz

 

freshwater, glacier-formed lake which existed around 10,000–12,000 years ago along the edge of the retreating glacial mantle in North America. It extended 1,100 km from north to south and 400 km from west to east, with a maximum depth of more than 200 m. Lake Agassiz drained into the Mississippi River through the valleys of the Warren and Minnesota rivers. It existed for about 1,000 years and then was drained by the Nelson River, which formed a valley to the Hudson Bay. Remaining on the site of Lake Agassiz are Lake Winnipeg, Lake Manitoba, Lake Winnipegosis, Lake of the Woods, and others, as well as a broad belt of flat plains composed of varved clays, with fertile, gray forest gley (clay) soils. Farming is widely developed in these plains. The lake was named in honor of the Swiss naturalist J. Agassiz.

References in periodicals archive ?
The noted Swiss naturalist Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz (1807-1873) arrived in Charleston in 1847 for an extended visit.
Agassiz and his men hacked through jungle, sweltered in flyblown tents, and risked death and disease in order to fill up jars and safely transport them back to the United States.
French-Canadian voyageurs took advantage of the waterways and traveled the old drainages of Lake Agassiz from Montreal to the Hudson Bay, camping on the islands of Rainy Lake without leaving any commentary on the ancient quartz veins lying just under the thin soil and pine roots of their campsites.
Today, Agassiz is largely forgotten outside academia.
Among the prime movers behind the creation of the National Academy of Sciences were Agassiz and Bache.
The use of scale size, shapes and number can be traced back to the first half of the 19th century when Agassiz [1] used it in fish taxonomy for the first time [40,9] and even some fishery biologists also used scale in determining the age of fish [23].
New discoveries of both vertebrates and arthropods from the "Atholville Beds", beginning in the 1990s, resulted in a redescription of the eurypterid fauna (Miller 2007a, b) and assignment of all known specimens to Pterygotus anglicus Agassiz 1844, the large pterygotid first described from Scotland.
EDITOR'S NOTE--Presented here is another in the list of historic accounts of iconic research cruises of the USFC Steamer Albatross, this a reminiscence of the renowned scientist Alexander Agassiz edited by his son G.
1830s -- Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz presents evidence of past changes in Alpine glaciers, pointing to ancient Ice Ages and showing that the climate has not always been stable.
at Agassiz Rock Trustees of Reservations, School Street, Manchester by the Sea.
Agassiz would encounter a capable opponent in Asa Gray, eminent Christian botanist and friend of Charles Darwin.