Agglutinative Languages

Agglutinative Languages

 

languages whose characteristic morphological feature is word formation and word change through agglutination.

Among the agglutinative languages are the Turkic languages; the Finno-Ugric languages; the Tungus-Manchurian, Korean, and Japanese languages; some of the American Indian languages; and a number of African languages. Agglutinative languages are contrasted to flective or flectional languages, although agglutinative languages also exhibit traits of flection (for example, Finnish and Udmurt), while flective languages make some use of agglutination.

References in periodicals archive ?
Suffixation is a widely used word formation in Old Turkic as well as in modern Turkic languages as agglutinative languages.
Examples of the agglutinative languages are Turk and the similar ones--Kazakh, Kyrgyz, etc.
The morphology of agglutinative languages is also finite, thought the number of possible word forms is much greater than in an inflective language.
In all agglutinative languages, agents, datives and objects are marked and grammaticalised by bound morphs.
Similarity consists in highly developed prefixation and suffixation but in Zulu both are used in a way typical for agglutinative languages, this certainly holds for noun prefixes.
Zulu is an agglutinative language and uses affixes to express a variety of grammatical relations and meanings.
To provide an example, whereas English speakers rarely produce new words they have never used before, so that the words they do use may be very likely stored as wholes in the mental lexicon, speakers of agglutinative languages (such as Turkish, for example) have to construct words anew when producing language.
Hannu Panu Aukusti Hakola: 1000 Duraljan Etyma: An Extended Study in the Lexical Similarities in the Major Agglutinative Languages.
Turkish belongs to the family of agglutinative languages.
A prefix tree representation is probably far more useful for agglutinative languages than for English because of the many inflected forms of the same stem.
Secondly, in terms of morphological typology, both languages tend to develop characteristics of agglutinative languages.
In this respect Finnish resembles other agglutinative languages such as Swahili and Turkish.