battery

(redirected from Aggravated battery)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

battery,

in criminal and tort law, the unpermitted touching of any part of the person of another, or of anything worn, carried by, or intimately associated at that moment (as a chair being sat on) with another. Contact must be intended by the aggressor, must be reasonably considered offensive, and must be without consent by the one affected. (Consent is assumed for the ordinary and customary contacts of everyday life.) Gross negligence may provide the intent necessary to constitute a battery. Actual physical injuries need not be sustained by the victim; thus a doctor who performs an operation without consent can be sued for battery, even though the patient is benefited by the operation. The term "assault and battery" refers to a crime, the unlawful touching of another as the consummation of an assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Battery

 

(military), the basic artillery firing subunit. Batteries can be separate (regimental battery, coast artillery battery) or can be part of artillery battalions (regiments). The concept “battery” originally signified a large tactical unit containing a specific number of guns (for example, the French Army’s 100–gun battery at the Battle of Wagram in 1809). In Russia an organic firing unit was introduced in 1833 instead of a company. In modern armies a battery contains from two to three firing platoons, a headquarters platoon (squad), and from two to six guns (infantry mortars) or from four to six mounts. In combat all components of the battery are generally utilized. Batteries of regimental, antitank, and low caliber antiaircraft artillery can also be employed in platoons or by the piece. Subunits which undertake topographic, sound-ranging, and optical reconnaisance are also called batteries. There are also headquarters batteries, maintenance batteries, training batteries, and so on.

battery

[′bad·ə·rē]
(chemical engineering)
A series of distillation columns or other processing equipment operated as a single unit.
(electricity)
A direct-current voltage source made up of one or more units that convert chemical, thermal, nuclear, or solar energy into electrical energy.
(ordnance)
A group of guns or other weapons, such as mortars, machine guns, artillery pieces, or of searchlights, set up under one tactical commander in a certain area.

battery

1. A combination of two or more electric cells capable of storing and supplying direct current by electrochemical means.
2. Any group of two or more similar adjacent plumbing fixtures which discharge into a common horizontal waste or soil branch.

battery

1. 
a. two or more primary cells connected together, usually in series, to provide a source of electric current
b. short for dry battery
2. another name for accumulator
3. Criminal law unlawful beating or wounding of a person or mere touching in a hostile or offensive manner
4. Chiefly Brit
a. a large group of cages for intensive rearing of poultry
b. (as modifier): battery hens
5. Psychol a series of tests
6. Chess two men of the same colour placed so that one can unmask an attack by the other by moving
7. the percussion section in an orchestra
8. Baseball the pitcher and the catcher considered together

battery

A storage device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. Used by the billions each year from tiny hearing aid batteries to units that some day may be 40 feet long (see illustration below), the battery is constructed of positive and negative metal electrodes. When the two electrodes are connected together by a circuit on the outside, a chemical reaction is created inside, and electrons flow from the negative electrode through an electrolyte to the positive electrode creating a voltage difference. The electrolyte material prevents the electrons from flowing until the circuit is completed on the outside.

The First Battery
Alessandro Volta invented the first battery in 1800 to sustain an electric current. His "voltaic pile" was a stack of cells, each containing a brine-soaked cloth sandwiched between zinc and copper discs. He got the idea from Luigi Galvani, who in the late 1700s generated current from two dissimilar metals joined together by a frog's muscle. Over time, there has been progress! See batteries.


The Liquid Metal Battery
This battery technology uses molten metals and was invented for the U.S. electrical grid, but all batteries work the same. When the electrodes are connected to a load on the outside (light bulb, electronic circuit, electrical grid, etc.), electrons flow from the negative electrode to the positive electrode through the electrolyte. See liquid metal battery.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following year on July 28, 2003, she was back in jail for 30 days for unspecified parole violation for her previous aggravated battery felony.
Ricardo Barnhart was convicted of two counts of aggravated battery for the beating of his wife and injury to 38-week gestation unborn child on March 19, 2013; mother and child survived.
In Florida, the Orange county sheriff's office said Todashev had been arrested on May 4 and charged with aggravated battery with great bodily harm.
Eighteen-year-old Michael Ward and twenty-year-old Kenneth Williams from Chicago will face trial on first-degree murder, attempted murder and aggravated battery with a firearm in the assault, which also injured two others, RT reported.
In 2009, Abbate was convicted of aggravated battery and sentenced to probation.
The ex-boyfriend was subsequently charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery.
The suspects were arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary, aggravated assault, aggravated battery, criminal restraint, theft, and criminal damage to property.
He was tried for attempted murder in the US and found guilty of aggravated battery.
Eugene Roman, 50, pleaded guilty to aggravated battery and kidnapping charges in the May 2006 attack.
After the guilty verdict, it emerged that 65-year-old Landry, who beat Pontypridd-born Lucy, 38, over the head with a rolling pin before stabbing her 23 times with a carving knife at their Worcestershire home, had been convicted of aggravated battery in October 1994.
It emerged after the guilty verdict that Landry had been convicted of aggravated battery in October 1994 after gunning down a love rival while living in Covington, Louisiana.
It emerged after the verdict that Landry had been convicted of aggravated battery in October 1994 after gunning down a love rival while living in Covington, Louisiana.