agonist

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agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
The London-based political theorist argues that this unique project of political and economic integration must redefine itself along agonistic lines in order to survive.
Agonistics aborda tambien asuntos de actualidad internacional, como el destino de la Union Europea, con un enfasis en los movimientos de protesta que la crisis mundial genero en los ultimos anos y busca diferenciarse de las perspectivas moralistas que, en opinion de la autora, inundan la politica actual.
Moreover, in a cultural field such as sport where play has a significant discursive status (for example, play is clearly central to sport's foundation narrative) but is at odds with dominant forms of capital (those of capitalism), its meanings and functions are likely to be relatively contingent and the subject of (non-playful) agonistics.
Such are the main claims of Harrowitz's essay, which concludes with the programmatic summation that "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a "par adigmatic" agonistic text on two basic counts (1997, 193).
But for all these martial metaphors, these agonistic flourishes, the emblem of the Splash
We will get into the `ring' alongside these competitors, and follow the agonistic rhetoric of their sallies, until the point where riddle and counter-riddle bring the bout to an end.
His agonistics and emphasis on dissensus suggest that conflicts also take place in language and that contesting existing discourses is an important component of social criticism and transformation.
Benhabib criticizes any reading of Arendt that ignores the narrative element in her theory of action in favor of a Nietzschean agonistics.
Read between the lines and Carducci comes close to diagnosing rock as the prime symptom of a late-20th-century crisis of American masculinity: music as the agonistics of young men looking for somewhere to direct their surplus energy, now that it's not needed for manual labor or warfare.
The agonistics responsible for the dialogism that Bakhtin describes and for the dissemblance by which being does its work in Heidegger's ontology is, for Creeley, the detritus that modulate and transform various orders that are (mis)placed in our daily lives; the way we respond to the residue that blocks our paths continually qualifies our intentions and forces us to replace the economies with which we attempt to realize them.