agonist

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Related to Agonists: Partial agonists

agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Aroclors and ortho-substituted PCBs contain or are partial agonists that suppress TCDD-induced immunotoxicity, presumably through competitive binding to the AhR (Peters et al.
Prostate cancer treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist increases the risk of developing diabetes and coronary heart disease, according to an observational study of about 73,000 men with local or regional prostate cancer.
TLR agonists find use either alone or as adjuvants in combination with vaccine antigens.
The somatic gene transfer method allows dose-dependent detection of TH agonists in brain and muscle.
Prescribing practices for the key branded non-insulin classes - TZDs, DPP-IV inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists - vary widely among the seven major markets.
The report includes a compilation of currently active projects in research and development of novel adenosine receptor agonists & antagonists.
LIDDS' single intratumoral injections of a NanoZolid formulated STING agonist has been proven to achieve significant effects on tumour growth reduction and overall survival, the private company disclosed on Thursday.
Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists trigger instead of hCG in the context of OHSS prevention has been used for >25 years.
Yong-Jun Liu, senior vice president, R&D and head of Research, MedImmune, said, "We're pleased to collaborate with 3M Drug Delivery Systems to explore TLR agonists as monotherapy and in combination with our internal immuno-oncology portfolio.
307), a slight decrease but no statistical significance in de novo subgroup without any DA agonists, L-dopa or other anti-PD drugs.
These regimens are characterized by the use of relatively low doses of GnRH agonists starting in the mid-luteal phase of the cycle and usually ending at the time of menses or soon afterward, in combination with high doses of gonadotrophins.
An initial evaluation of assay performance showed that the assays behaved as expected in terms of biological activity of known agonists and antagonists included as positive control compounds in the screening libraries.