Ahasuerus


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Ahasuerus

(āhăs'yo͞oē`rəs), Hebrew form of the name Xerxes, as used in the Bible. The Ahasuerus in the Book of Esther is probably Xerxes I. That in the Book of Tobit may be Cyaxares I, destroyer of Nineveh. The name of the father of Darius the MedeDarius the Mede,
in the Bible, a king of the Medes who succeeded to the throne of Babylonia after Belshazzar. Otherwise unknown outside biblical tradition, it is likely that this Darius has been confused with Cyrus the Persian, who succeeded Belshazzar and decreed (539 B.C.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is also given as Ahasuerus.

Ahasuerus

(519–465 B.C.) Persian king rectifies wrongs done to Jews. [O.T.: Esther 8:7–8]
See: Justice

Ahasuerus

German name for the Wandering Jew. [Ger. Lit.: Benét, 1071]

Ahasuerus

Old Testament a king of ancient Persia and husband of Esther, generally identified with Xerxes
References in periodicals archive ?
Mordecai, had saved the life of the king by reporting to Esther an assassination plot against Ahasuerus that he overheard by the palace gates, so the king owed him a special debt.
44) Tornabuoni's retelling here follows the biblical text, yet mitigates the biblical characterization of the king as ineffective by describing him as a just and loved ruler, adding her own details that Ahasuerus had ruled in peace for twenty-two years and that all bore him great love: "Et da ciaschun tenuto in grande amore" (BNF, Magl.
Whether it was Queen Esther beseeching King Ahasuerus not to murder an entire people or commoners in Rome hankering to wear purple, subjects have always endured atrocities and degradation from their rulers.
The strangeness of the Mariner and his experience have not in any way been reincorporated into a Christian community: if anything, the Mariner lies in the tradition of Ahasuerus, the Wandering Jew, as an outcast.
One example is "Hester and Ahasuerus," the title of which identifies the narrative source as the Book of Esther.
The invention of the formal postal system is attributed to ancient Persia, when Ahasuerus, king of the Persians, used couriers to communicate his decisions.
A Jewish festival celebrating the deliverance of the Jewish exiles in the Persian Empire from a plot by Haman, a royal vizier to King Ahasuerus, to kill them.
The wicked Haman convinced King Ahasuerus to order a great slaughter of the Jews.
From the opening description of the court and royal feast we learn that Ahasuerus, the wealthy and mighty king of Persia and Media, does not force the revelers to drink the portion set before them.
When Haman tried to convince the Persian king Ahasuerus of his genocide plan, he depicted the laws of the Jews as being different from those of every other people (Esth 3:8).
Esther's Revenge at Susa: from Sennacherib to Ahasuerus.
The clever queen wines and dines her husband, King Ahasuerus, who is made to see the treachery of his adviser.