Aidos


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Aidos

ancient Greek personification of conscience. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 14]
References in periodicals archive ?
He argues convincingly that Plato's location of aidos in the thumos shows that more than fear of external sanctions is involved, and that the philosopher's writings offer little support for the view that Greek society was a shame culture (392).
it can spring from a form of conscience based on internalized moral standards" (431), and he provides a good treatment of the role of aidos in education.
To sum up: Aidos will be an indispensable tool for future studies of this extremely important, but too long neglected, ethical concept, and of other, related concepts, such an honor and hubris.
It will have become clear that I am arguing for a link between aidos and social status.
With these passages in mind it is not difficult to perceive a good sense to Phaidra's listing of aidos among those `pleasures' of life which may impede a person from pursuing a certain course of action, perhaps one which is morally better.
At the same time, the sense of aidos I am arguing for here strikes a chord with later words in Phaidra's rhesis.
How precisely this aidos which I have attempted to identify impedes right action requires further explanation.
We have found relatively clear cases where Euripidean characters recognize that the aidos which goes with position can lead to inadequate behaviour: Admetus and Agamemnon.
But Phaidra's perception that aidos can, on occasion, lead one astray, is a comment not only on her own moral struggle, but also on that of the protagonist Hippolytos.
448f, who explains aidos in our passage in terms of moral scruples which sometimes harmonize with rational perception, sometimes not.
6) It is true that Craik's best alleged parallel (Theognis 1263-6) implies sexual gratification through innuendo when the poet says that a boy whom he has treated well has failed to show aidos to him, but only by innuendo.
von Erffa, AIDOS und verwandte Begriffe in ihrer Entwicklung von Homer bis Demokrit (Philologus suppl.