aileron

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Related to Ailerons: yaw

aileron:

see airfoilairfoil,
surface designed to develop a desired force by reaction with a fluid, especially air, that is flowing across the surface. For example, the fixed wing surfaces of an airplane produce lift, which opposes gravity.
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; airplaneairplane,
 aeroplane,
or aircraft,
heavier-than-air vehicle, mechanically driven and fitted with fixed wings that support it in flight through the dynamic action of the air.
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.

Aileron

 

a control surface that constitutes a certain fraction of the rear portion of a wing of an airplane or a glider. Ailerons can be deflected upward or downward and are used to control an aircraft with respect to its longitudinal axis. When deflected, an aileron produces a difference in lift between the right and left wings of an aircraft.

Ailerons are usually differential—that is, are deflected through a greater angle upward than downward—in order to reduce yawing moments when banking and to increase the control effectiveness near critical angles of attack. Ailerons provide lateral stability and make it possible to fly along curves—for example, to make a 360° banked turn—without slipping.

Ailerons may be double-slotted or triple-slotted. They may be supplemented by spoliers, trim tabs, or trimmer-flatteners (seeHIGH-LIFT DEVICES). In design, an aileron is similar to a wing.

aileron

[′āl·ə‚rän]
(aerospace engineering)
The hinged rear portion of an aircraft wing moved differentially on each side of the aircraft to obtain lateral or roll control moments.
(architecture)
A half gable, such as that which closes the end of a penthouse roof or of a church aisle.

aileron

A half gable, such as that which closes the end of a penthouse roof or of the aisle of a church.

aileron

aileronclick for a larger image
A primary flight control surface mounted on the trailing edge of the wing, which controls the rolling movement of the aircraft or its rotation about its longitudinal axis. The ailerons move differentially—the up-going aileron is on the side where the aircraft is banked, whereas the down-going aileron is on the side of the up-going wing.

aileron

a flap hinged to the trailing edge of an aircraft wing to provide lateral control, as in a bank or roll
References in periodicals archive ?
Mehlhaff told us that the stresses imposed on the aileron hinge support area on the Xtremes that were being used for more aggressive maneuvers caused premature wear in the area.
Later, as we watched the pass on the PLAT recording, we saw the true airspeed go from 150 to 170 knots as the ailerons visibly faired.
For CFD simulations, four different equally spaced sections have been used, along with a 3D model of the complete aileron, thus being able to study the 2D air flow at different locations on the wing's span and also providing an overall image of the three-dimensional flow pattern.
Defence and security company Saab (STO:SAABB) has received a contract extension with Airbus for the A320-family Aileron for the life of this programme.
It was noticed that the left aileron ground-adjustable trim tab was intentionally bent to nearly maximum deflection, and an extra ground-adjustable trim tab had been installed on the right aileron (it, too, had been bent to nearly maximum deflection).
Saab signed the contract with Airbus to produce ailerons for the A320 in 1999.
This particular FCF was scheduled following maintenance on the port leading-edge-flap universal, the starboard rudder servo and port aileron servo.
The ailerons are moved up or down to create uneven lift on the sides of the plane to control its rolling and tilting movements.
A simplified 3D model of the rocket has been constructed, paying a special attention to the point of interest for the current study, namely the movable red ailerons in the back of the space vehicle shown in Figure 1.
The device, an electrohydrostatic actuator, moves wing components called ailerons that control the side-to-side movement of the plane.
On the F/A-18, the ailerons provide not only roll control, they also add lift or drag during takeoff and landing.