Aix-la-Chapelle, Treaty of


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Aix-la-Chapelle, Treaty of

(ĕks-lä-shäpĕl`). 1 Compact of May 2, 1668, that ended the French invasion of the Spanish Netherlands (see Devolution, War ofDevolution, War of,
1667–68, undertaken by Louis XIV for the conquest of the Spanish Netherlands. On her marriage to Louis, Marie Thérèse, daughter of Philip IV of Spain, had renounced her rights of inheritance in return for a large dowry.
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). France kept most of its conquests in Flanders; Cambrai, Aire, Saint-Omer, and the province of Franche-Comté were returned to Spain; and the remainder of Spain's possessions in the Low Countries were guaranteed by the Triple AllianceTriple Alliance,
in European history, any of several coalitions. 1 The Triple Alliance of 1668 was formed by the Netherlands, England, and Sweden against France after Louis XIV had invaded the Spanish Netherlands in the War of Devolution.
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. 2 Treaty of 1748, ending the War of the Austrian SuccessionAustrian Succession, War of the,
1740–48, general European war. Causes of the War

The war broke out when, on the strength of the pragmatic sanction of 1713, the Austrian archduchess Maria Theresa succeeded her father, Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, as ruler
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. In general, it restored the status quo ante, but it awarded Silesia and Glatz to Prussia and conferred the duchies of Parma, Piacenza, and Guastalla on the Spanish infante Philip. It confirmed the pragmatic sanctionpragmatic sanction,
decision of state dealing with a matter of great importance to a community or a whole state and having the force of fundamental law. The term originated in Roman law and was used on the continent of Europe until modern times.
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 of 1713, and it renewed Britain's privilege (acquired 1713) over transporting slaves to Spanish America, the trade agreements with Britain regarding the Spanish colonies, and the recognition of the Protestant succession in England.