Akedah


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Akedah

biblical account of God commanding Abraham’s offerings. [Jewish Hist.: Wigoder, 17]
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In reading the story through the inter-textual references to the Genesis story of the Akedah, Pozorski discusses the limits of the law in the face of vulnerable children and within the context of the history of the Holocaust.
Isaac may have been a passive personality, (1) but according to rabbinic tradition he was a full-grown adult, 37 years old, at the time of the Akedah.
Deflecting tragedy to comedy, the akedah turns and turns again upon Abraham who successively answers "here I am" to God commanding, to Isaac questioning, to the angel saving.
Following a discussion of Eco and his literary method, Huizenga discusses the meaning of the Akedah prior to the time of Christ, then delves into an exacting reading of the story in the First Century CE and afterwards, in the Gospel of Matthew.
Philip Quinn takes the akedah as an example of moral dilemma, much like the one that Aeschylus's Agamemnon faced.
The biblical story of the Akedah (the binding of Isaac) is the key of this volume.
A few years ago, I reviewed in these pages another book for young children published by Holiday House that dealt with the Biblical story of the Akedah, the binding and near-slaughter of Isaac.
The Torah Shrine, the defining feature of the synagogue's architecture, which held the scrolls of scripture, displays a centrally placed Temple facade flanked by Temple accoutrements on the left, such as the menorah, lulav, and etrog, and the binding of Isaac on the right--a reminder of the Temple's association with Mount Moriah, the traditional site of the Akedah or sacrifice of Isaac.
This chapter is suggestive and engaging, although the reader is left wondering about the ultimate philosophical meaning of Kierkegaard's reading of the Akedah.
In drawing creatively upon midrashic material about the Akedah (the binding of Isaac as he is about to be sacrificed), Diski's "supplement" Wright suggests, is perhaps best viewed in the Derridean sense of the term, in that it both adds onto and replaces the original text.
His poem "In the full Severity of Mercy" (Be-Khol Humrat ha-Rahamim) recalls God's promise to Abraham after the akedah (the binding of Isaac) that the Israelites would be numerous as stars and grains of sand by the sea (Genesis 22:17); this resonates with irony.