Akko


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Akko

(ăk`ō) or

Acre

(ā`kər, ä`–), Fr. Saint-Jean d'Acre, Arab. Acca, city (1994 pop. 45,300), NW Israel, a port on the Bay of Haifa (an arm of the Mediterranean Sea). Its manufactures include iron and steel, chemicals, and textiles. The city was captured (A.D. 638) by the Arabs, who developed its natural harbor. In 1104 it was captured in the First Crusade and was held by Christians until 1187, when it was taken by Saladin. In the Third Crusade it was won back (1191) by Guy of Lusignan, Richard I of England, and Philip II of France, who gave it to the Knights Hospitalers (the Knights of St. John, hence its French name). For the next century it was the center of the Christian possessions in the Holy Land. Its surrender and virtual destruction by the Saracens in 1291 marked the decline of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Crusades. Akko was taken by the Ottoman Turks in 1517 and was revived in the late 18th cent. under Dahir al-Umar, the local Ottoman ruler. In 1799, Ottoman forces, with the aid of Great Britain, withstood a 61-day siege by Napoleon I. The city was taken in 1832 by Ibrahim Pasha for Muhammad Ali of Egypt, but European and Ottoman forces won it back for the Ottoman Empire in 1840. British troops captured the city in 1918. Akko was assigned to the Arabs in the 1948 partition of Palestine, but it was captured by Israeli forces in the Arab-Israeli war of that year. By the 1990s its population was about three fourths Jewish and one fourth Arab. The city is a popular tourist site. Landmarks include an ancient citadel, walled fortifications, the al-Jazzar mosque, and several churches dating from the Crusades.
References in periodicals archive ?
Birdsong & Robins (1995) added Akko to the Gobiosomatini, but did not comment further on relationships due to the large number of autapomorphies it possesses.
This declaration of his fragility goes on to speak the most delicate assertion of his poetry: "The epicists have falcons, and I have /The Collar of the Dove," the wings of love that would return him to Akko's port, as he had mentioned in an earlier poem, "Ivory Combs," where his "mother had lost her handkerchiefs"; or maybe it is as he retells it in Mural: "I might /add the description of Akko to the story / the oldest beautiful city / the loveliest old city / a stone box / where the dead and the living move / in its clay as if in a captive beehive.
In 1967 Father Raya was elected the new Archbishop of Akko, Haifa, Nazareth, and all Galilee.
I stayed in East Jerusalem and immersed myself for a few days in the politics of the region with trips to Jericho, Ramallah, Bethlehem, Hebron, Akko, Haifa and Ashkelon.
After an Arab volunteer in the Israel Defense Forces, Sergeant-Major Khalil Taher, was killed by Hezbollah on the Israeli-Lebanese border on November 27, the imam of Akko -- an employee of the Israeli ministry of religion -- refused to officiate at his funeral.
endorsed right to return to their homes, not in the West Bank and Gaza, but to Haifa and Akko in what is now Israel.
This poem is suffused with the sensual textures of life, the tastes and smells of Akko, a city in the north of Israel on the Mediterranean coast.
The tournament will take place in and around the cities of Netanya, Ashkelon, Bat Yam and Akko from 1-14 of the month.
Safed, Tiberias and Beit Shean were emptied of Arab occupants, and Akko, Haifa, Yaffo and Lod were left with diminished Arab populations.
The Vatican made it known in July that the Pope appointed Mouallem archbishop of Akko, a diocese of 45,000 Melkite Christians in Galilee.
The new fonts - Akko, DIN and Calibri - have been selected to be more environmentally friendly, known for using little ink and paper.