acrasia

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acrasia

[ə′krā·zē·ə]
(psychology)
Lack of self-control.

Acrasia

self-indulgent in the pleasures of the senses. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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But then something other than my deliberative verdict must be at work in causing me to act akratically--that simply follows from the nature of akrasia.
10) Tom Tillemans draws parallels between Santideva's view of akrasia and views of Western thinkers such as Plato and Donald Davidson.
Scholars of philosophy from the Americans and Europe explore what classical Greek philosophers said about akrasia (lack of control) which they attributed to a deficiency either of the knowledge or of motivation needed to maintain control.
Perhaps the simplest example of private preferences jostling is the philosopher's venerable phenomenon of akrasia, "weakness of will.
focuses on "voluntarism" (the will's freedom to override reason's dictates), moral weakness (the contrast between Aristotle's akrasia and the Christian understanding of sin), and the "location" of the moral virtues (whether in the emotions and passions or in the will alone).
And his emphasis on the role of biochemical "regulatory controls' resonates with a number of psychological models that relate risk-taking to the concept of akrasia, or lack of control.
June 2 June 30 August 4 Good Brother Earl Shari Richards & Missing Pages Chris Francese June 9 August 11 Akrasia July 7 Walt Harper Loose Booty June 16 - FARMERS August 18 MARKET BEGINS
Stalley, "Persuasion and the Tripartite Soul in Plato's Republic" in Akrasia in Greek Philosophy, ed.
Relevant here is his argument for rejecting epistemic akrasia (42).
14) Often, however, a person acts against his better sense, disregarding reason's advice: the phenomenon of akrasia, or what Aristotle calls, incontinence.
Encouraging him to stop would be equivalent to encouraging the ex-smoker to take on a form of akrasia (weakness of will).
Thero (cognitive science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Adirondack Community College) considers this akrasia within the philosophic tradition, recognizing both weak (satisfying a less strict set of criteria) and strict types.