Aksum

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Aksum

or

Axum

(both: äkso͞om`), town (1994 pop. 27,148), Tigray region, N Ethiopia. Aksum was the capital of an empire (c.1st–8th cent. A.D.) that controlled much of what is now N Ethiopia. In the 4th cent. the emperor Ezana was converted to Christianity, and today Aksum is a major center of Ethiopian Christianity. The Ark of the Covenant is said to have been brought there from Jerusalem in Solomon's time and placed in the church of St. Mary of Zion, where Ethiopia's emperors were later crowned. The town is also noted for its gigantic carved pre-Christian obelisks, and there is an extensive underground royal necropolis.
References in periodicals archive ?
While this was happening, the Abyssinian Aksumite Christian kingdom was losing its strength and started declining (3).
These Aksumite churches preserve what seem to be the characteristics of the first churches in Ethiopia.
This, for example, might have helped my own study of the pottery from Aksumite Adulis across the Red Sea in Eritrea.
Unfortunately, little is known about them -- how or why they were constructed, the rituals associated with them, how they relate to the adjacent tombs, or Aksumite life in general.
In particular, he blames the "hegemonic weight of the Aksumite and Orientalist Semiticist paradigms" for creating an Ethiopian history that is largely dynastic, clerical, and elitist.
This study of the establishment of Christianity in the Aksumite kingdom of Ethiopia, which was accepted in 1993 by the Catholic Theological Faculty of the University of Bonn as an inaugural dissertation, is an expanded version of the article which appeared in Reallexicon fur Antike und Christentum, Suppl.
The traditional account is that they were created during the King's reign (1181-1221) in a period of religious revival following a shift of power southwards after the decline of the Aksumite Empire in around the 8th century.
Aksum invaded South Arabia several times during late antiquity, the invasions of 518 and 525 in the reign of the Aksumite king Kaleb being the main focus of this dissertation.
George Hatke's forthcoming Princeton dissertation, "Africans in Arabia Felix: Aksumite Relations with South Arabia, 300-600," argues forcefully for the primary role of Syrian rather than Axumite Christianity in the Christianization of South Arabia.
This title publishes the results of the 2004-2005 Eritro-British Expedition to the port at Adulis, which was a major port of the Roman period and played a pivotal role in the Aksumite trade from the fourth to seventh centuries CE.