Aksum

(redirected from Aksumite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Aksum

or

Axum

(both: äkso͞om`), town (1994 pop. 27,148), Tigray region, N Ethiopia. Aksum was the capital of an empire (c.1st–8th cent. A.D.) that controlled much of what is now N Ethiopia. In the 4th cent. the emperor Ezana was converted to Christianity, and today Aksum is a major center of Ethiopian Christianity. The Ark of the Covenant is said to have been brought there from Jerusalem in Solomon's time and placed in the church of St. Mary of Zion, where Ethiopia's emperors were later crowned. The town is also noted for its gigantic carved pre-Christian obelisks, and there is an extensive underground royal necropolis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the absence of Aksumite sculpture and other Himyarite royal images, it is not surprising that parallels for the different attributes of the crowned figure (Figure 3) are rare or imprecise.
These Aksumite churches preserve what seem to be the characteristics of the first churches in Ethiopia.
Carving is sharp and crisp, as if contemporary, despite being constructed over 16 centuries ago and the stylized details (presumed, like classical triglyphs, to be petrified timber details) are typical of the Aksumite style.
3-36) presents the noetical method mentioned above and contains a short description of the linguistic material to be analyzed--[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] literature in its Aksumite and post-Aksumite stages.
One radiocarbon date from a hearth in association with black ware indicates that this component dates to approximately the 11th century AD, or the post Aksumite era,
We are reminded of the potentially negative unintended outcomes of the much-trumpeted re-erection, against advice, of the great Aksumite stele repatriated from Rome.
George Hatke's forthcoming Princeton dissertation, "Africans in Arabia Felix: Aksumite Relations with South Arabia, 300-600," argues forcefully for the primary role of Syrian rather than Axumite Christianity in the Christianization of South Arabia.
This title publishes the results of the 2004-2005 Eritro-British Expedition to the port at Adulis, which was a major port of the Roman period and played a pivotal role in the Aksumite trade from the fourth to seventh centuries CE.
The Aksumite kingdom's capital owed much of its prosperity to its location, and its very name gives an indication of the advantage it held.
The traditional account is that they were created during the King's reign (1181-1221) in a period of religious revival following a shift of power southwards after the decline of the Aksumite Empire in around the 8th century.
Similar coin moulds are documented from Hellenistic Cyprus (Nicolaou 1990), Aksumite Ethiopia (Wilding 1989), and early Islamic Pakistan (Khan 1990).