Capp

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Capp

Al, full name Alfred Caplin. 1909--79, US cartoonist, famous for his comic strip Li'l Abner
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They brought the sharpened perspective and the moral anxiety of the outsider to this artistic expression, and, from Rube Goldberg to Al Capp, Will Eisner, and Art Spiegelman, to mention only several of the giants, they have strongly influenced the cartoon arts.
Al Capp, the L'il Abner comic strip creator, parodied this event, creating a blustering, overbearing character called General Bullmoose who proclaimed, "What's good for General Bullmoose is good for the country
Anyone who remembers the Dogpatch characters created by the late cartoonist Al Capp will probably remember Joe Btfsplk.
CAN anyone send me information, articles, material on the life and career of American cartoonist Al Capp (1909-79), the creator of the Li'l Abner-Yokum cartoon strip?
By the following year, cartoonist Al Capp accused television of going the way of radio and airing editorial views "bought" by advertisers, something he argued would never occur in "any great American newspaper.
Despite the genius evident in the work of Winsor McKay (Little Nemo), Walt Kelly (Pogo), Al Capp (Li'l Abner), George Herrimann (Krazy Kat), and many others, comics have generally been treated as worthless trash to keep the kids quiet.
On August 13, 1934, the satirical comic strip ''Li'l Abner,'' created by Al Capp, made its debut.
From 1934-1977, Al Capp satirized the social/political landscape of America through the characters of his comic strip, "Li'l Abner.
If adapter Kirk Lynn and helmer Shawn Sides had taken a cue from past theatrical treatments of comicstrip art (as executed by the likes of Al Capp, Charles Schulz and Jules Feiffer), those two-dimensional guys would come alive onstage.
Despite being on the sidelines, Caplin did yeoman's work on behalf of American GIs under his pen name, Al Capp.
This provocative statement by the cartoonist Al Capp was heard on March 12 by a Boston audience of several hundred.
While average New Yorkers go about their day in bright sunlight in the background, the actors seem to be caught in a very small weather front, kind of like Joe Btfsplk, the Al Capp cartoon character who walked around with his own personal rain cloud hovering over his head.