Al-Battani

Al-Battani

(äl-bät-tä`nē) or

Albatenius

(ăl'bətē`nēəs), b. before 858, d. 929, Arab astronomer and mathematician. He is best known in astronomy for his improvements and corrections of the Ptolemaic tradition. His Kitab al-Zij, which in Latin translation was very influential in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, contains an elaborate set of astronomical tables and discusses a wide range of practical problems in spherical astronomy, some of which were devised for the purpose of solving related astrological problems. He recognized the possibility of an annular eclipse of the sun and obtained the very accurate value of 23°35' for the obliquity of the ecliptic.
References in periodicals archive ?
She is surrounded by, clockwise from left, Tycho Brahe the star measurer, holding a compass to a celestial sphere; Claudius Ptolemy with, presumably, his great book the Almagest; al-Battani (Albategnius) of Raqqa, Syria, mathematician and a refiner of Ptolemy's work during the golden age of Arabian science; and becrowned King Alfonso the Wise of 13thcentury Spain, a patron of astronomy incongruously holding a Sun-centered model of the solar system.
It is suffice here to evoke a few glorious names without contemporary equivalents in the West: Jabir Ibn Haiyan, al-Kindi, al-Khwarizmi, al-Farghani, al-Razi, Thabit ibn Qurra, al-Battani, Hunain ibn Ishaq, al-Farabi, Ibrahim ibn Sinan, al-Masudi, al-Tarabi, Abu ibn Wafa, Ali ibn Abbas, Abu-l-Qasim, Ibn al-Jazzar, al-Biruni, Ibn Sina, Ibn Yunus, al-Karkhi, Ibn al-Haitham, Ali ibn Isa, al-Ghazzali, al-Zarqali, Omar Khayyam
La desaparicion significo la perdida de aproximadamente el 80% de la ciencia y la civilizacion greco-helenistica, ademas de legados importantisimos de culturas asiaticas y africanas, lo cual se tradujo en el estancamiento del progreso cientifico durante mas de cuatrocientos anos, hasta que felizmente seria reactivado durante la Edad de Oro del Islam (siglos IX-XII) por sabios de la talla de ar-Razi, al-Battani, al-Farabi, Avicena, al-Biruni, al-Haytham, Averroes y tantos otros.
Another Muslim mathematician, al-Battani (850-929), built upon the foundations of trigonometry established by such great Greek mathematicians as Hipparchus and Ptolemy.
He also worked tirelessly to summarize Zij al-Battani (Ibn Abi Usaybi'ah, 1962).
858-929 - Abu Abdullah Al-Battani (Albategnius) - Astronomy,
The author mentions scholars such as: "Jabir ibn Haiyan, al-Kindi, al-Khwarizimi, al-Farghani, al-Razi, al-Masudi, al-Tabari, Thabit ibn Qurra, al-Battani, Hunain ibn Ishaq, Abdul-i-Qasim, al-Farabi, Ibrahim ibn Sinan, al-Biruni, Ibn Sina, Ibn Yunus, al-Karhi, Abdul-i-Wafa, Ali, ibn Abbas, Ibn al-Jazzar, Ibn al-Haitham, Ali ibn Isa, al-Ghazzali, al-Zarqali, and Omar Khayyum" (61) who have contributed significantly to current Western practices and philosophies.
Now the astronomical works of, say, al-Khwarizmi (Indian and Sasanian influence) and al-Battani (Greek influence), and the mathematical works of the same al-Khwarizmi (essentially Babylonian algebra and Indian arithmetic), were particularly influential in Europe, regardless of the fact that they were already out-dated and surpassed in the Islamic world.
In the ninth century, Iranian astronomer al-Battani discovered that for a sundial to function properly, the needle must point toward Polaris (North star).
Albategnius was the 9th-century Syrian al-Battani, whose extremely accurate trigonometry tables were used by Copernicus and Tycho.