Alain de Lille

(redirected from Alan of Lille)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Alain de Lille

(älăN` də lēl), c.1128–c.1202, French scholastic philosopher, a Cistercian, honored by his contemporaries as the Universal Doctor. He was born in Lille; he taught at Paris and Montpellier before retiring to Cîteaux. Alain attempted to give rational support to the tenets of Christian faith in his writings. He held that the mind unaided by revelation can know the universe, but by faith alone can man know God. Although his thought was largely Neoplatonic, he made use of numerous Aristotelian and neo-Pythagorean elements. The mathematical and deductive method had an important place in the working out of his theology. One of his chief works, De fide catholica contra haereticos, was written in order to refute heretics and unbelievers. Alain de Lille was also one of the foremost didactic poets of his day; his chief poem Anticlaudian (tr. 1935) is a complicated allegory. He is also called Alanus de Insulis, the Latin form of his name.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Boethius, Abelard, and Alan of Lille we see here are not confident in the powers of reason to grasp either God or the world.
Thinkers such as Alan of Lille, who held grammarians responsible for policing deviations in language and who imputed those deviations to a deeper violation of the natural order, reinforced a connection between the policers and the violators.
What does this cartoon have to do with Alan of Lille and Dante, neither of whom professes any knowledge of the game of horse shoes or the modern weapons known as hand grenades (at least not in any extant work)?
Along the way, she considers work by Henry of Suso, Julian of Norwich, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Chaucer, Bernard Silvestris, Alan of Lille, Hildegard of Bingen, and Dante, to name only the best known, as well as some very interesting images drawn mostly, but not exclusively, from manuscript illustration.
Susan Schibanoff mixes text analysis with queer theories in examining the grammatical techniques used by Alan of Lille to denounce male same-sex relations.
Alan of Lille sought to shore up the reasonableness of Nature by shifting responsibility for libido to Venus and Cupid.
Hutcheson's "The Sodomitic Moor: Queerness in the Narrative of Reconquista" and Susan Schiaboff's "Sodomy's Mark: Alan of Lille, Jean de Meun, and the Medieval Theory of Authorship" contribute to our understanding of their respective subjects.
We need to hear about that, and there is nothing in this study about Alan of Lille, for example.
Concentrating on five authors: Hildebert of Lavardin, Adelard of Bath, Bernardus Silvestris, Lawrence of Durham and Alan of Lille, Balint explores the variety of topics for which prosimetria was adopted.
The first part consists of essays by Marilynn Desmond and Pamela Sheingorn, `Queering Ovidian myth: bestiality and desire in Christine de Pizan's Epistre d'Othea'; Susan Schibanoff, `Sodomy's mark: Alan of Lille, Jean de Meun, and the medieval theory of authorship'; Michael Camille, `The pose of the queer: Dante's gaze, Brunetto Latini's body'; and a response by Karma Lochrie, `Presidential improprieties and medieval categories: the absurdity of heterosexuality'.
The dominant figures in her history are Augustine, Anselm, and Boethius, with significant use of Alan of Lille and Peter Abelard as well.
Gerson frequently returns to the necessity of integrity, without which the absolution is invalid,(87) a position he inherits from, among others, Alan of Lille,(88) Peter of Poitiers,(89) and Thomas of Chobham.