Alain de Lille

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Alain de Lille

(älăN` də lēl), c.1128–c.1202, French scholastic philosopher, a Cistercian, honored by his contemporaries as the Universal Doctor. He was born in Lille; he taught at Paris and Montpellier before retiring to Cîteaux. Alain attempted to give rational support to the tenets of Christian faith in his writings. He held that the mind unaided by revelation can know the universe, but by faith alone can man know God. Although his thought was largely Neoplatonic, he made use of numerous Aristotelian and neo-Pythagorean elements. The mathematical and deductive method had an important place in the working out of his theology. One of his chief works, De fide catholica contra haereticos, was written in order to refute heretics and unbelievers. Alain de Lille was also one of the foremost didactic poets of his day; his chief poem Anticlaudian (tr. 1935) is a complicated allegory. He is also called Alanus de Insulis, the Latin form of his name.
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Consciente de las variaciones a que estan sujetas tales connotaciones, el autor acrecienta que en el diccionario de simbolos de Alanus de Insulis (siglo XII), "siempre que el [Alanus] menciona el dia y la noche juntos, siempre que contrasta su significado simbolico, el dia es invariablemente el componente bueno o superior del par y la noche es invariablemente el malo o inferior" (21).
In the twelfth century, Alanus de Insulis is said to have asked: 'Whither has not flying fame spread and familiarised the name of Arthur the Briton, even as far as the empire of Christendom extends?
67), Alanus de Insulis (also Alain de Lille) (1128-1202), Ramon Llul (1234-1316), Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Teresa de Avila (1515-1582), Robert Fludd (1574-1637), Jacob Bohme (1575-1624), Angelus Silesius (1624-1677), Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), William Blake (1757-1827), Novalis (1772-1801), Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), Leon Bloy (1846-1917), G.
The thirteenth-century preacher Alanus de Insulis, for example, begins his sermon Ad coniugatos by quoting Saint Paul (1 Cor.
This mythographical conceit was extremely well known to medieval writers on love; central texts, including the De Planctu naturae of Alanus de Insulis and the Roman de la Rose of Jean de Meung, offer images of a lustful Venus who seeks war with Chastity and a good Venus figure, a Venus caelestis, who acts in accordance with the heavenly order, as 'Natura's subvicar in procreation' (p.
RABANO MAURO, De universo, PL 111, 417 A; ALANUS DE INSULIS, Theologica regulae, PL 210, 666 C; passim.