Alaska Range

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Alaska Range,

S central Alaska, rising to the highest mountain in North America, DenaliDenali,
formerly Mount McKinley,
peak, 20,310 ft (6,190 m) high, S central Alaska, in the Alaska Range; highest point in North America. Permanent snowfields cover more than half the mountain and feed numerous glaciers.
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 (Mt. McKinley; 20,310 ft/6,190 m). The range divides S central Alaska from the great plateau of the interior. Mt. Spurr, an 11,070-ft-high (3,376-m) volcano 80 mi (129 km) W of Anchorage erupted several times in 1992 after a dormancy of 39 years.

Alaska Range

 

a mountain range in southern Alaska, in the system of the North American Cordilleras. The range is about 1,000 km long, with mean elevations of about 3,000 m. The highest peak in the range and in all of North America is Mount McKinley (6,193 m), around which is the Mount McKinley National Park. The Alaska Range was formed in the Jurassic Age. In the axial part it is composed of intrusive rock (granodiorites); along the edges, of sedimentary rock. The slopes are steep, rocky, and rugged. Railroads and highways have been built through the deep and sometimes rather broad valleys which cut through the Alaska Range. The range is an important climatic boundary. The wet southern slopes are covered by coniferous forest up to an elevation of 800 m and above this level are covered by eternal snows which feed the large valley glaciers. The northern slopes are more arid, with the timber line reaching up to 1,000–1,100 m. Mountain tundra lies above the forests. [1–1478–1 ]

Alaska Range

a mountain range in S central Alaska. Highest peak: Mount McKinley, 6194 m (20 320 ft.)
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From the rugged Caribbean jungle, to the Alaskan mountains, to the base of the world's largest trees, the gorgeous, innovative new courses in Golden Tee LIVE 2013 will take golfers to unique locations loaded with fascinating elements.

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