albumin

(redirected from Albumins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Albumins: fibrinogen, Globulins

albumin

(ălbyo͞o`mən) [Lat.,=white of egg], member of a class of water-soluble, heat-coagulating proteinsprotein,
any of the group of highly complex organic compounds found in all living cells and comprising the most abundant class of all biological molecules. Protein comprises approximately 50% of cellular dry weight.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Albumins are widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, e.g., ovalbumin of egg, myogen of muscle, serum albumin of blood, lactalbumin of milk, legumelin of peas, and leucosin of wheat. Separation of serum albumins from other blood proteins can be carried out by electrophoresis or by fractional precipitation with various salts. Albumins normally constitute about 55% of the plasma proteins. They adhere chemically to various substances in the blood, e.g., amino acids, and thus play a role in their transport. Albumins and other proteins of the blood aid significantly in regulating the distribution of water and maintenance of proper osmotic pressure in the body. Albumins are also used in textile printing, in the fixation of dyes, in sugar refining, and in other important processes.

Albumin

A type of globular protein that is characterized by its solubility in water and in 50% saturated aqueous ammonium sulfate. Albumins are present in mammalian tissues, bacteria, molds, and plants, and in some foods. Serum albumin, which contains 584 amino acid residues, is the most abundant protein in human serum, and it performs two very important physiological functions. It is responsible for about 80% of the total osmotic regulation in blood, and it transports fatty acids from adipose tissue to muscle. When excessive amounts of albumin are found in the urine upon clinical examination, some form of kidney disease is usually indicated. Another important albumin, ovalbumin, is found in egg white. This protein is about two-thirds the size of serum albumin, and it contains sugar residues in addition to amino acid residues (that is, it is a glycoprotein). See Protein

albumin

[‚al′byü·mən]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group of plant and animal proteins which are soluble in water, dilute salt solutions, and 50% saturated ammonium sulfate.

albumin

, albumen
any of a group of simple water-soluble proteins that are coagulated by heat and are found in blood plasma, egg white, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These samples were also used in the portion of the study that compared albumin levels measured from serum and plasma.
Albumin was quantified using a dry slide technology with BCG methodology.
The differential reactivity of assays to modified albumins is likely to be primarily related to the type of antibodies employed, although there may also be differences between competitive and noncompetitive assay formats.
Comparison of albumin:total protein ratios for modified or fragmented albumins analyzed by 2 different assays for urinary albumin.
Unbound proteins were eluted from the spin columns, and columns were washed with TBS before elution of bound albumin with 100 mmol/L glycine (pH 2.
This definition was based on the assertion by the column manufacturer that a functioning column depletes >95% of albumin (16), allowing for minimal variation in the assay measurement of albumin concentration.
Bovine serum albumin (BSA), CA, human al-acid glycoprotein, human al-antitrypsin, human holo-transferrin, sodium chloride, urea, glucose, and [beta]-hydroxybutyrate were acquired from Sigma-Aldrich.
SENSITIVITY AND LINEARITY OF ALBUMIN DETECTION BY CHIP ELECTROPHORESIS
The mobility of the albumin variant relative to the normal albumin was determined by comparison with the normal protein peak in the instrument database and by electrophoresis of a mixture of the patient's serum sample and normal serum in different proportions.
In this investigation, we isolated both normal and variant forms of albumin from the plasma of six heterozygous subjects with different genetic mutations and compare measured mass changes with those expected on the basis of the aberrant protein sequence.
Dye-binding albumin methods would likely be used to initially assess albumin status in undiagnosed patients with analbuminemia.
In summary, this book is a must for those who use albumin to restore failing circulation or to promote nutritional functions, as well as for clinical researchers of plasma protein metabolism and transport of substances in blood.