Alchemilla


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Related to Alchemilla: Lady's Mantle, Alchemilla mollis, Alchemilla vulgaris

Alchemilla

 

(lady’s-mantle), a genus of plants of the family Rosaceae. They are perennial and, rarely, annual herbs that are generally short with woody rootstocks. The leaves are rounded, palmately lobed, and wrinkled; the basal leaves are in rosettes. The small, bisexual flowers are green or yellowish and gathered in glomerulate compound cymose-paniculate inflorescences. The sepals are arranged in two circles, and there are no petals. Apomixis is characteristic of many species of lady’s-mantle. There are approximately 300 species, distributed predominantly in Europe; they are also encountered in Asia, Africa, and America. More than 200 species are found in the USSR, mainly in the forest zone and in the forest, subalpine, and alpine mountain zones. They also grow in meadows, shrubbery, glades, and light forests, as well as along brooks and streams, forest edges, and paths. The rootstock and leaves of lady’s-mantle contain dye substances.

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LIERAC Botanical Synergy of Alchemilla, Ivy and Horsetail (35% concentration in GEL, 80% concentration in SOLUTION) rich in flavonoids and tannins to a smooth, tighten and firm the skin.
Plants such as vinca or periwinkle and alchemilla are robust, grow well in the shade and provide good ground cover, keeping weeds down.
Some herbaceous plants will also set copious amounts of seed if they are not cut back so cut back the flower heads of alchemilla to stop it spreading across the whole garden.
Under taller shrubs and roses, plant good ground cover perennials such as wild geranium (cranesbill) or Alchemilla mollis, and take note of the atmosphere you want to create through colour.
Herbaceous ground cover like hardy geraniums and alchemilla mollis are pretty tough and can easily be incorporated into many front gardens, he notes.
LADY'S MANTLE Also known as alchemilla, this is a fantastic all-rounder and a tough plant suitable for problem areas.
You'll see old-fashioned favourites coming back like alchemilla, acanthus and euphorbias, and safe varieties like Euphorbia 'Wulfenii', because it's likely to do well and you don't have to keep replacing it.
And there's alchemilla mollis, Japanese anemones - especially the white varieties - aquilegias, astrantias, brunnera, campanula persicifolia, coreopsis verticillata, dicentra spectabilis, doronicum Miss Mason, echinops ritro, geraniums Wargrave, grandiflorum and Johnson's Blue, geum Mrs Bradshaw and Lady Stratheden, heleniums, hemerocallis or day lillies, lupins, lychnis coronaria, monarda, nepeta, phlox, pulmonarias, rudbeckias, sedum spectabile, sidalcea, stachys lanata and tradescantia.
Other good linking plants include the apple green Alchemilla mollis.
The patio is packed with those they've collected over the years - yuccas, fuchsia, clematis, lobelia, sedum, alchemilla, schizostylis, montbretia and pyracantha - as well as cheerful annuals like nasturtium, impatiens, annual dianthus, double petunias, the Poor Man's Orchid (Schizanthus) and godetia.