Alciphron


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Alciphron

(ăl`sĭfrŏn, –frən), fl. c.A.D. 200?, Greek satirist. His only extant work, in fine Attic style, consists of over 100 fictitious letters from ordinary people living in Athens in the 4th cent. B.C.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
35) By the Second Sophistic, authors like Alciphron had transformed the ethopoetic letter into a high literary art, attempting to sustain appropriate characterizations without falling into non-Attic solecisms or anachronisms.
Much of the current analytic and Anglophone philosophy concerned with Berkeley is focused on his metaphysics and epistemology, these largely drawn from his early Principles, Three Dialogues, or works on vision, and to a growing extent, Alciphron.
In 1733 Berkeley followed his bequest with the donation of a thousand books to Yale's library, including works of philosophy, science, history, theology, and poetry, including his own Alciphron, an attack on modern infidelity.
A similarly worded argument in Alciphron avoids confusion since Berkeley denies that things like tables can be said in any unqualified sense to be seen.
Fraser wrote that 'Tradition tells that much of Alciphron was the issue of meditation in the open air, at a favourite retreat, beneath the Hanging Rocks, which commands an extensive view of the beach and ocean .
And as Berkeley shows in Alciphron, the argument to design is unaffected by the shift to idealism; it's an argument drawn from patterns within experience, and doesn't require the existence of material substance.
Chapter 5, on Berkeley's conception of philosophy as apologetics, focuses mainly on Alciphron, in particular Berkeley's assault on freethinking.
7; Berkeley, Alciphron, Dialogue 4, section 2; Hume, Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, 8 (i.
In this volume's last paper, 'Berkeley on Religion', Stephen Clark addresses Berkeley's philosophy of religion, stated mainly in Alciphron (1732), but constantly present in all his works.