Alciphron


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Alciphron

(ăl`sĭfrŏn, –frən), fl. c.A.D. 200?, Greek satirist. His only extant work, in fine Attic style, consists of over 100 fictitious letters from ordinary people living in Athens in the 4th cent. B.C.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Bernard Mandeville], A Letter to Dion; Occasion'd by his Book call'd Alciphron or, the Minute Philosopher (London: J.
Para estudiar estas cuestiones, Flage reviso obras como Philosophical Commentaries (1707-1708), Passive Obedience (1712), los ensayos en el periodico Guardian (1713) y Alciphron (1732).
FOBES, The Letters of Alciphron, Aelian and Philostratus, Cambridge [Mass.
35) By the Second Sophistic, authors like Alciphron had transformed the ethopoetic letter into a high literary art, attempting to sustain appropriate characterizations without falling into non-Attic solecisms or anachronisms.
Much of the current analytic and Anglophone philosophy concerned with Berkeley is focused on his metaphysics and epistemology, these largely drawn from his early Principles, Three Dialogues, or works on vision, and to a growing extent, Alciphron.
Il veut faire l'extrait d'un ouvrage anglais intitule Alciphron du docteur Barclay (67), qui passe pour un saint dans sa communion.
For example, adults ofLycaena alciphron (Rottemburg, 1775), Lycaena virgaureae (L.
In 1733 Berkeley followed his bequest with the donation of a thousand books to Yale's library, including works of philosophy, science, history, theology, and poetry, including his own Alciphron, an attack on modern infidelity.
Alciphron, Lettres de pecheurs, de paysans, de parasites et d'hetaires, traduit et edite par Ozanam, A.
A similarly worded argument in Alciphron avoids confusion since Berkeley denies that things like tables can be said in any unqualified sense to be seen.
This fascination can be traced both in parodic mimicry of actual women poets (as shown by Skinner's study of the appropriation of "the gendered gaze" by poets Theocritus and Herodas) and in stylization of a voice of a legendary fourth-century BCE courtesan Phryne in a fictional correspondence composed by Alciphron some six centuries after (Rosenmeyer).
14] --, Alciphron of the Minute Philosopher (1732).