Alcoholics Anonymous


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Related to Alcoholics Anonymous: alcoholism, Narcotics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

(AA), worldwide organization dedicated to the treatment of alcoholics; founded 1935 by two alcoholics, one a New York broker, the other an Ohio physician. They developed a 12-step program that has made coping with alcoholism possible for countless people. It includes psychological principles that have long been used in the reorganization of personality. The organization functions through local groups that have no constitutions, officers, or dues. Anyone with a drinking problem may become a member. There are presently over 99,000 local groups in the United States; worldwide membership is approximately 2 million. Other groups patterned on AA include Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, and Gamblers Anonymous.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

society of ex-alcoholics who help alcoholics to stop drinking. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 356]

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

organization founded to help alcoholics (1934). [Am. Culture: EB, I: 448]
References in periodicals archive ?
Humphreys and colleagues (1991) reported that women would be more likely to affiliate with AA than men despite a recent Alcoholics Anonymous membership survey that found that 67% of AA members are male (Alcoholics Anonymous, 2008).
In his Twelve Traditions, Wilson set down the suggested bylaws of Alcoholics Anonymous and thereby created a blueprint for an organisation that wanted a maximum of individual freedom, and no link to power or money.
Benefits of Alcoholics Anonymous attendance: Replication of findings between clinical research sites in Project MATCH.
I have been sober since February and I attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings; I am drug-tested three times weekly.
Alcoholics Anonymous saved my life: Without the program that I had in the past steadfastly refused to practice, I most certainly would be dead now.
After an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Nurse Green explains that she knew Kenzie's father when they both were children, and she tells of his physical and psychological abuse by his own alcoholic mother.
Sister Molly Monahan, Seeds of Grace: A Nun's Reflections on the Spirituality of Alcoholics Anonymous.
Mr Asbury said the aim was create an alternative joining normal addiction groups like Alcoholics Anonymous, giving the members a different kind of practical help.
Participants started each therapy group with an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and closed with discussions of Sexuality and spirituality guided by the author.
Social workers may need more information about Alcoholics Anonymous to determine their own meanings and interpretations of the controversies surrounding this program.
Substance abuse treatment in the United States consists mainly of 12-step self-help programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA).
The most well-known programs are Alcoholics Anonymous and its derivatives (e.