alder

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alder

(ôl`dər), name for deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Alnus of the family Betulaceae (birchbirch,
common name for some members of the Betulaceae, a family of deciduous trees or shrubs bearing male and female flowers on separate plants, widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. They are valued for their hardwood lumber and edible fruits and as ornamental trees.
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 family), widely distributed, especially in mountainous and moist areas of the north temperate zone and in the Andes. The black alder (A. glutinosa) is an Old World species now naturalized in E North America. Its bark, still used for dyes and tanning, was formerly considered medicinal; its wood is useful chiefly as charcoal. A. rugosa, the speckled alder, forms extensive swamp thickets in Eurasia and North America. The red alder (A. rubra), the largest tree of the genus, is the most important hardwood timber tree in its native region, the Pacific coast of North America. Alder trees are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Fagales, family Betulaceae.

alder

[′ȯl·dər]
(botany)
The common name for several trees of the genus Alnus.

alder

A moderately light-colored, light-weight hardwood that changes to flesh color or light brown when dried; often stained to simulate cherry, mahogany or walnut; often used as plywood core and crossbanding.

alder

1. any N temperate betulaceous shrub or tree of the genus Alnus, having toothed leaves and conelike fruits. The bark is used in dyeing and tanning and the wood for bridges, etc. because it resists underwater rot
2. any of several similar trees or shrubs
References in periodicals archive ?
While alders are fast growers, the trees have relatively short life-spans of 60 to 100 years.
There are 36 species of alders worldwide in the Betulaceae Family and one trait they share in common is a love of water.
All Finnic and Mordvinic names for alder (Alnus) have a lepp-stem: Finnish, Karelian, Ingrian, Votic leppa, Lude lep(p[?
The same name as is used for alder refers in Finnic dialects also to the blood of a killed animal, as well as to the blood or liquid mixed with blood issuing from a living body (e.
Mr Malcolm Morse, prosecuting, said Dunwoody and the victim had a brief relationship but Miss Alders finished with him because of his excessive drinking.
Then, in a dramatic gesture, the defendant put the blade of the knife to his own stomach and told Miss Alders to kill him, the court was told.
More often than not, white alders in Los Angeles either die within 20 to 30 years of being planted, or they persist in a dried-up, sorry-looking state.
PHOTO : Alders loaded at an Olympic Peninsula tree farm (right) will wind up as chips, like the ones on this ship in the Port Angeles harbor (below), bound for Japanese pulp and paper makers.
Ones who are so competent and experienced that they give our customers an added value our competitors find hard to match," says Mats Alders, President and CEO of Cyber Com.
While alders grow quickly, the species is not generally a long-lived one.
Other alders from North America include sitka alder (Alnus sinuata), which grows as far as the Arctic Circle in Alaska; mountain alder (Alnus tenuifolia) which is a short, shrub-like tree; California alder (Alnus rhombifolia) also called white alder; and Arizona alder (Alnus oblongifolia) or Mexican and New Mexican alder.
LOTTERY cash could help pay for a new-look Alder Hey hospital.