Aleijadinho


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Aleijadinho

(älāzhädē`nyō) [Port.,=little cripple], 1730–1814, Brazilian sculptor. His real name was Antônio Francisco Lisboa. Although he was maimed in hands and feet, he is known for the brilliance of his church sculpture. His most famous works are the carvings in the Church of São Francisco at Ouro PrêtoOuro Prêto
[Port.,=black gold], city (1996 pop. 61,606), Minas Gerais state, E Brazil. Founded as Vila Rica in the gold rush near the end of the 17th cent., it became a prosperous 18th-century mining town, a cultural center, and the chief seat of the abortive move for
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 and the statues of the Twelve Prophets at Congonhas do Campo. The distinctive baroque style of Aleijadinho's works, carved in wood and indigenous soapstone, has caused much church sculpture in his native Minas Gerais to be attributed to him.

Aleijadinho

 

(literally, “small cripple,” pseudonym for Antonio Francisco Lisbôa). Born Aug. 29, 1730 or 1738, in Villa Rica; died there on Nov. 18, 1814. Brazilian architect and sculptor.

Aleijadinho was the son of the architect M. F. Lisboa (who died in 1766) and a Negro slave. He was deformed by leprosy and worked by attaching his tools to his gloves. A representative of the late baroque school, Aleijadinho built the Sao Francisco church in Ouro Préto (1766–94), which is remarkable for its dynamic composition, plastic form, elegant decoration, and fine carvings on the portals. He also designed the facade of the church Bom Jesus de Matozinhos in Congonhas (1757–77), with 12 stone statues of prophets (completed in 1805) on the stairways; these statues are brilliantly executed and express dynamism and pathos. In the garden chapels of this church he created six wooden painted groups entitled The Lord’s Passions (1780–99). He gave the judges, guards, and executioners in these groups a satirical resemblance to Portuguese colonial officials.

REFERENCE

Mariano, I. A. F. Lisboa. Rio de Janeiro, 1945.
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The museum is best of its kind in Brazil, this museum includes works by renowned 18th-century sculptor Antnio Aleijadinho, along with some 200 other ecclesiastical works from the 17th to the 20th centuries.
What is remarkable about them is not just the exquisite skill of the carving, or the infinitely gentle, infinitely suffering humanity of their faces, but the fact that by the time he carved them, Aleijadinho had been struck down by leprosy.
He has published articles on Brazilian artist the Aleijadinho in CR: The New Centennial Review (2012), on Junot Diaz in Caribe (2013), and on the Afro-Reggae movement in Hispania (2014).
World Heritage site Ouro Preto, in the wealthy mining state of Minas Gerais, is famous for its fine baroque buildings and its haunting sculptures carved in the late 19th century by the great Aleijadinho.
But he suffered a debilitating disease, thought to be leprosy, and was given the name - by which he is best known - of Aleijadinho, meaning 'little cripple'.
And it was from within this inescapable academicism that our greatest names emerged, the likes of the Aleijadinho, Costa Ataide, Claudio Manuel, Goncalves Dias, Gonzaga, Jose Mauricio, Nepomuceno and Aluisio.
Its most famous artist was Antonio Francisco Lisboa, better known as Aleijadinho, or the Little Cripple.
Aleijadinho was the most prominent artist of his day, and his works grace most of the churches of the cities of gold.
Cemin readily agrees, and produces a book about the self-taught 18th-century Brazilian sculptor known as Aleijadinho, or the Little Cripple.
But two smaller towns turned out to be the most memorable - first Congonhas, the site of the extraordinary sculptures of the Prophets by Aleijadinho.
The religious statuary of Aleijadinho, the legendary eighteenth-century sculptor and leper who overcame his handicap by working with a hammer strapped to the stump of his arm, was chronicled by Naylor during her trip to Congonhas do Campo in Minas Gerais.
some of the luminaries to be discussed include Cuban essayist, poet and political leader Jose Marti (October 1); Nicaraguan master of modernist literature, Ruben Dario (October 8); Spanish lyric poet Juan Ramon Jimenez (October 15); Chilean Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda (October 22); North American Nobel Laureate Ernest Hemingway (November 5); Argentine composer Alberto Ginastera (November 12); Brazilian sculptor and architect Aleijadinho (November 19); and Spanish film director Luis Bunel.