Solzhenitsyn

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Related to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: Vladimir Nabokov, gulag, Boris Pasternak, Mikhail Bulgakov

Solzhenitsyn

Alexander Isayevich . born 1918, Russian novelist. His books include One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962), The First Circle (1968), Cancer Ward (1968), August 1914 (1971), The Gulag Archipelago (1974), and October 1916 (1985). His works criticize the Soviet regime and he was imprisoned (1945--53) and exiled to Siberia (1953--56). He was deported to the West from the Soviet Union in 1974; all charges against him were dropped in 1991 and he returned to Russia in 1994. Nobel prize for literature 1970
References in periodicals archive ?
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, "Templeton Address," The Solzhenitsyn Reader, eds.
That writer, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, died on August 3, 2008, at the age of 89.
In September 1993, just months before his triumphant return to post-communist Russia, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn traveled to a remote village in the Vendee region of western France.
Thirty-one years later, on September 18, 1991, in a lecture at Vanderbilt University, Buckley spoke about our Cold War victory and some of those responsible for that victory: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and other brave dissidents; the Russian citizens who sheltered Boris Yeltsin from Soviet tanks; and President Ronald Reagan whose rhetoric, military buildup, and diplomacy forced Kremlin leaders to look in the mirror at "their advanced emaciation.
At least two Welsh politicians have been shaped by the classic portrayal of life in the Russian gulag, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.
Seniors learned about the Russian revolution in history and began a study of "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich," by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, in literature.
31, 1999, poll to identify the century's greatest Russians, readers of the Izvestiya daily placed Lenin second behind former human rights dissident Andrei Sakharov and just ahead of writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.
Brothers James Ronald Kennedy and Walter Donald Kennedy represent the spirit of other patriots like Lech Walesa, Light Horse Harry Lee, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and Mohandas Gandhi who inspired their people to regain their independence.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who, unlike Hitchens, lived in a secular Russia, has described Lenin's "achievement" with greater precision: "tens of thousands of priests, monks, and nuns, pressured by the Chekists to renounce the word of God, were tortured, shot in cellars, sent to camps, exiled to the desolate tundra of the far north, or turned out into the streets in their old age without food or shelter.
ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISOVICH - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (1962)
The story is, by now, well known: when he was exiled from the then Soviet Union in 1974, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn took with him pages and notes for a book to be called The Red Wheel, a fictionalized history of the years leading up to the Russian Revolution.