Alès

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Alès

(älĕs`), formerly

Alais

(älā`, älĕs`), city (1990 pop. 42,296), Gard dept., S France, in Languedoc, at the foot of the Cévennes Mts., on the Gardon River. Once noted for cloth and silk, its industries now focus on making machinery, electrical equipment, and hosiery. Base metals and silver are mined nearby. In the 16th cent. Alais was one of the principal centers of French Protestantism (see HuguenotsHuguenots
, French Protestants, followers of John Calvin. The term is derived from the German Eidgenossen, meaning sworn companions or confederates. Origins

Prior to Calvin's publication in 1536 of his Institutes of the Christian Religion,
..... Click the link for more information.
). The Peace of Alais, signed there (1629), stripped the Huguenots of their political power. Several buildings date from the 17th cent.
References in classic literature ?
Bede, I'm sorry you've to wait so long for your ale, but it's coming in a minute.
Then one who held a horn of ale in his hand said, "Ho
Trumbull, finishing his ale and starting up with an emphatic adjustment of his waistcoat.
Dame Eliza looked doubtfully at him, as though fearing some other stratagem, but, as he made no demand for ale, she finally brought the paints, and watched him as he smeared on his background, talking the while about the folk round the fire.
With those noble words the honorable gentleman clapped him on the back, and held out his tumbler for some more ale.
If you should go near Barnard Castle, there is good ale at the King's Head.
I always maintain that there's nothing to compare with your home-brewed ale.
I heard all this, much to my satisfaction, for I found plainly that the tankard was not missed, and yet they concluded it was fetched away; so I drank my ale, called to pay, and as I went away I said, 'Take care of your plate, child,' meaning a silver pint mug, which he brought me drink in.
But he soon perceived that though he might be a little the worse (or better) for ale, the staple of his excitement was not brewed from malt, or distilled from any grain or berry.
demanded Sikes, pushing the ale towards his new friend.
Pickwick having refreshed himself with a copious draught of ale, waited his friend's leisure.
Breakfast being at length over, Mr Codlin called the bill, and charging the ale to the company generally (a practice also savouring of misanthropy) divided the sum-total into two fair and equal parts, assigning one moiety to himself and friend, and the other to Nelly and her grandfather.