Alexander of Aphrodisias


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Alexander of Aphrodisias

(ăfrōdĭsh`ēəs), fl. A.D. 200, Greek Peripatetic philosopher. A celebrated ancient commentator on Aristotle, he was often called the Exegete. Among his extant writings are portions of commentaries on several of Aristotle's works, including the Metaphysics, as well as some original treatises. These latter include On the Soul, in which Alexander examines the nature of human intellect, and On Fate, a refutation of the Stoic doctrine of determinism. Some of the works attributed to Alexander are thought to be spurious.
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Ross, but he also mentions more historically distant sources too, such as Alexander of Aphrodisias and the commentary of Thomas Aquinas.
Also, this can be documented through the work of Alexander of Aphrodisias (de Fato) seen through the counterfactual that if this were not so, it would destroy the unity of the cosmos (p.
Alexander of Aphrodisias, whose reading of Aristotle's De Anima was so influential in the East and the West.
Alexander of Aphrodisias and his Doctrine of the Soul; 1400 years of lasting significance.
Instead, like Alexander of Aphrodisias before him, Ibn Sina adopts the simplified version of the theory, positing only nine spheres, while at the same time appropriating the remaining Aristotelian views: that the so-called Prime Mover, being both the efficient and final cause in the sense of an object of both love and thought (to orekton kai to noeton), (47) produces motion while all other things move by being moved, and that the first moving sphere, which embraces all the orbs involved in the daily motion, seeks to become as much like the Prime Mover as possible and thus wishes to come to rest in imitation of the First Unmoved Mover.
Through an analysis of the Heidelberger Disputation from 1518 the author tries to show, that the position of Luther--that the immortality of the soul can not be shown by means of Aristotelian natural philosophy but only through principles of faith--gets some support by the position of Alexander of Aphrodisias, who maintains that in accordance with Aristotelian natural philosophy, the human soul has to be thought of as mortal.
Todd, Alexander of Aphrodisias on Stoic Physics: A Study of the De mixtione [Leiden: Brill, 1976]).
The author argues that reading Alexander of Aphrodisias on perceptual error offers an understanding of Aristotle that can help us to make good sense of both of Aristotle's claims.
Nevertheless it was Alexander of Aphrodisias in the second century who first introduced these syllogisms; Galen also discussed them and there is a detailed discussion in the later Western medieval logical tradition (particularly by William Ockham and John Buridan).
Nor do we need lengthy introductions of figures like Alexander of Aphrodisias in a context with such a precise purpose.
In 1857, Problems was published as a supplement to the four- volume series Medical Puzzles and Physical Problems, published over the first half of the 19th century and attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias, the commentator of Aristotle who flourished about 200 BC.
In providing an interpretative reading of Aristotle's Physics, Avicenna demonstrates knowledge of previous commentaries on the same work by the Stagirite, such as those by Alexander of Aphrodisias and Themistius, as well as the objections of John Philoponus to Aristotle's argument for the eternity of the world.