Korzybski

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Korzybski

Alfred (Habdank Skarbek). 1879--1950, US originator of the theory and study of general semantics, born in Poland
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74/75, and has presented papers on GS at the New York symposia in 2008 and 2011 following the Alfred Korzybski Memorial Lectures.
Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity (New York, 1921, 1950), p.
Kelley, Foreword to "A Veteran's Readjustment and Extensional Methods," by Alfred Korzybski, in Hayakawa's Language, Meaning and Maturity, pp.
Address presented to the Alfred Korzybski Memorial Lecture Series, New York.
While it is not my purpose in this essay to rename general semantics, it is my purpose to apply the insights of this re-definition of semantics to general semantics, and so it is my purpose to definitively characterize what general semantics and its founder Alfred Korzybski are examining in the intricate and expansive subject.
In general semantics, Alfred Korzybski promoted the use of indices on words (he calls them "indexes") to differentiate referents that shared the same name.
Alfred Korzybski was convinced that a scientific orientation toward
Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-ristotelian Systems and General Semantics (1933).
Cummings, articles by Wendell Johnson and Margaret Mead, and a 1922 essay by Alfred Korzybski titled "The Brotherhood of Doctrines.
This indicates to us that although the framework laid down by our founder, Alfred Korzybski, has provided us with an incredible intellectual foundation, the application of his theories and ideas has morphed and changed across the decades, responding to the times and needs of each generation.
In 1933, Alfred Korzybski published his second book, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics, twelve years after his first, Manhood of Humanity.
The upshot was the dedication of "The Alfred Korzybski Research and Study Center" in 1994, in the renovated nineteenth-century carriage house behind the home of Marjorie and Larry Zelner.