Alfvén wave

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Alfvén wave

[äl′vān ‚wāv]
(physics)
A hydromagnetic shear wave which moves along magnetic field lines; a major accelerative mechanism of charged particles in plasma physics and astrophysics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Alfven waves in this case tended to have great consistency in height-or amplitude, which is the common term when talking about waves-but they are random in direction.
The magnetic waves, called Alfven waves, are considered the most plausible explanation for the transfer of so much energy from the sun's surface to its corona.
Alfven waves move along the sun's magnetic fields like "waves traveling along a string," Jess explains.
For years, many solar physicists have believed that Alfven waves -- created from convective motions and acoustic energy jostling solar magnetic fields -- were most likely the force powering the solar wind.
We found that the chromosphere is permeated with Alfven waves that are energetic enough to accelerate the solar wind.
The result, rather than being a collection of papers, is an organized text with a logical order of topics, including accretion discs, discs with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and their response to orbiting planets, mixing at the surface of white dwarf stars, pulsar magnetospheres, magnetic fields in galaxies, self-consistent mean field electrodynamics in two and three dimensions, magnetoconversion, Alfven waves within the earth's core, turbulence models and plane layer dynamos, planetary and stellar dynamos, convection in rotating spherical fluid shells and its dynamic states, laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamos and liquid metal MHD turbulence and formation and stability in the solar system.
Instruments onboard, including those built at University of New Hampshire's Space Science Center, sampled electric and magnetic fields as well as charged particles in Earth's upper atmosphere (ionosphere) that get sloshed back and forth by a specific form of electromagnetic energy known as Alfven waves.
An international team of scientists has discovered that powerful magnetic field ripples, called Alfven waves, might be driving the solar wind and heating much of the corona.
Each bright spot represents a place where the sun's magnetic field lines form clusters that guide so-called Alfven waves into the atmosphere, according to the researchers.