algae bloom

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algae bloom

[′al·jē ‚blüm]
(ecology)
A heavy growth of algae in and on a body of water as a result of high phosphate concentration from farm fertilizers and detergents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lake Erie has experienced harmful algal blooms and severe oxygen-depleted "dead zones" for years, a condition that was widely thought to be the result of high levels of plant nutrients washing into the lake from farming operations in the watershed.
Dortch, who manages the ECOHAB and PCM HAB programs, says the Gulf of Maine forecasts will eventually be transitioned into NOAA's Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System, which already provides forecasts for Karenia brevis blooms off the coasts of Florida and Texas.
Not all algal blooms are dense enough to cause water discolouration, and not all discoloured waters associated with algal blooms are red.
Parker further said that the explosion of the algae would probably be an indicator that something is unbalanced in the ecosystem adding that the 2009 example algal bloom on the Brittany coast was a similar example of a human-induced algal bloom, the report added.
Algal blooms are more common during the spring and fall when there are higher water temperatures and greater movements of the ocean currents, according to a spokesman for the NSW Office of Water.
The NHC brings together research organizations, government agencies, communities and other groups to focus on harmful algal blooms while raising national-level awareness of bloom-related issues.
Fertilizers, high in the elements nitrogen and phosphorus, wash down rivers into oceans (see How Algal Blooms Form, below).
The group heard that improvements to Llanberis sewage works in October 2009 mean that fewer nutrients - one of the main causes of algal blooms - are getting into the lake from treated sewage effluent.
The study will lead the agency and other partners to draw up an action plan to tackle the cause of algal blooms in the lake.
The phenomenon known as a red tide is actually the result of an algal bloom, an event in which marine or fresh water algae accumulate rapidly in the water.
Thousands of fish died in the lake last week, the cause likely due to high levels of an algal bloom boosted by unusually warm spring weather rain.
RAVENSTHOPE Reservoir is setting up a two-year field trial to evaluate the use of barley straw to help stop algal bloom problems, starting this month.