Algonkian


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Related to Algonkian: Algonquian language

Algonkian

[al′gäŋ·kē·ən] Proterozoic
References in periodicals archive ?
As we worked with agents and editors in the commercial book business, during the early days of Algonkian Conferences and Novel Workshops, we incorporated the best of what we all knew and organized it in way that created maximum benefit for aspiring fiction authors.
Earthshapers and Placemakers: Algonkian Indian Stories and the Landscape.
The now English words in my list derive in fact from Spanish, Arabic, Nahuatl, Japanese, Algonkian, Sanskrit, and Hawaiian.
Like them, it uses carefully edited ethnographic detail--in particular the Manabozho legends of the Algonkian peoples recorded by Schoolcraft to build up a picture of a Native American society on the eve of colonization.
The Algonkian peoples, such as the Hatteras and the Pamlicos, lived along the coast.
Albanese, Nature Religion in America: From the Algonkian Indians to the New Age (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), 117-52; Stephen Nissenbaum, Sex, Diet, and Debility in Jacksonian America: Sylvester Graham and Health Reform (Chicago: Dorsey Press, 1980); Martha H.
From 1933 until death in 1950 he lived in Upper Woodstock, apparently in quite reduced circumstances, devoting his time to a deep study of the Malecite language and related Algonkian dialects.
Perhaps on calendars being sold for intertribal use we can use a name from each of twelve different language families (such as Siouan, Algonkian, Dine, Muskohegan, etc.
Mohawk" is in fact an anglicized version of an archaic Algonkian word meaning "cannibal monster.
Bailey, The Conflict of European and Eastern Algonkian Cultures, 1504-1700: A Study in Canadian Civilization (Sackville, N.
Statement of the "Church of the Earth Nation," quoted in Catherine Albenese, Nature Religion in America: From the Algonkian Indian to the New Age (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), 153.