Algonquian


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Algonquian

(ălgŏng`kēən, –kwēən), branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic family of North America. See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The pecan's name comes from an Algonquian word meaning "a nut that requires a stone to crack.
Papers of the Twenty-First Algonquian Conference (Ottawa 1990), 5.
Kurath's first major field trip in 1926 included the collection of materials on Algonquian dance in Philadelphia.
Algonquian stories and Maroon griot tales are "family stories" marked by the transmission of sophisticated knowledge.
Russell believes (e-mail to NE, 13/5/04) that, for Cree, "The looseness and interruptability of the 'prefixes' also seems very old and is shared by (at least) the surviving central Algonquian languages.
Many Algonquian nations were too embittered, having lost too much in the war, and most Dutch in New Netherland and the United Provinces came to see the war as a shameful blot on Dutch cultural reputation.
Algonquian and Iroquoian peoples, and Inuit, also helped the early Europeans survive.
As told in textbooks, movies, and in Smith's own writing, the young daughter of an Algonquian chief rescued the captain after he was captured by Indians.
They spoke English, a relatively new and remarkably pliant language that would easily absorb bits of Spanish, French and Algonquian.
The settlers overcame a number of difficulties in establishing the colony, including famines and fighting with the local native population, known as the Algonquian tribe.
Montreal author Howard Richler visits them all in Global Mother Tongue: The Eight Flavours of English, among them Portuguese (which gave us flamingo and molasses), Turkish (coffee, shish kebab), Hindi (juggernaut, guru) and Algonquian (moose and, from the Abenaki in Quebec, skunk).
In Mystic Voices: The Story of the Pequot War, producers/ writers/directors Guy Perrotta and Charles Clemmons unravel the tribal complexities of the Algonquian people, expand on the English motivation, and use the historical events to illustrate broader themes of culture clash and religious misunderstanding.