Algonquian

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Related to Algonquians: Iroquois, Algonquins

Algonquian

(ălgŏng`kēən, –kwēən), branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic family of North America. See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Canada' is an Iroquoian word for the settlement or locale of Quebec City as it was in the early 1500s, and Quebec (Kebec) is an Algonquian word for the 'narrows' of the great river thereabouts.
White documents how the Algonquian peoples appropriated Christian doctrine, converting the Christian God into "The Great Manitou" more than (or as much as) being themselves converted to Christianity.
The conversion of the Christian God into the "Great Manitou" by the Algonquian peoples was mirrored by an importation of manitous into Christian theology.
The word wampum is a shortened form of wampumpeag or wampumpeake, an Algonquian word of southern New England meaning a string of shell beads.
See Brightman, supra note 16, at 130-31 (noting Algonquian belief that killing animals increased their number through reincarnation); see also Christopher D.
Speculating why none of the region's Algonquians journeyed to England prior to the 1605 kidnapping, he does not tell us that there is no evidence of English fishermen plying Maine's coastal waters in the sixteenth century.
Highlights of studies on Amerindians elsewhere, especially the Iroquois, are occasionally substituted for unavailable evidence about Ohio Valley Algonquians.
several offshoots of a group archaeologists called the Algonquians began to migrate from their homeland north of the Great Lakes to the more fertile lands of present-day Wisconsin, Minnesota, and the Dakotas.
His two books are:Papers on Historical Algonquian & Iroquois Topics (2007): Dog Ear Press and Cannibalism In Cross-Cultural Perspective (2008): Dog Ear Press.