Algonquian

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Related to Algonquians: Iroquois, Algonquins

Algonquian

(ălgŏng`kēən, –kwēən), branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic family of North America. See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In lesser hands, interpreting the dreams of Puritans and eastern Algonquian people might degenerate into fiction.
LaCombe offers a detailed examination of the meaning of food in 'The New World', particularly the way food informed the early encounters between English settlers and the Algonquian Indians of the Atlantic Seaboard.
We can compare it to Algonquian textiles and to English textiles from the same period and note the similarities and differences in its decoration.
Specifically, internal conflict between Virginia Algonquians themselves combined with the external threats of Siouan and Iroquoian invaders to create a precontact Virginia characterized by warfare, uneasy truces, and shifting alliances.
Algonquian and Iroquoian peoples, and Inuit, also helped the early Europeans survive.
Dewdney argued that the pictographs, like the other images created by the Algonquians on wood, birch bark, and hide were all forms of expression (ibid.
The arrangement is by nations: Algonquians, Iroquoians, Siouans, and southeastern tribes.
Brightman, Conservation and Resource Depletion: The Case of the Boreal Forest Algonquians, in The Question of the Common, supra note 15, at 121, 129 (finding that technology "significantly lowered costs of pursuit and capture and increased rates of capture" of game in one Native American tribe).
The second details the sophisticated culture of contact-era Algonquians in coastal North Carolina and Virginia and their early interactions with the English.
Many were Virginia Algonquians, Mohawks, Cherokees, and Creeks, whose trips were sponsored by colonial corporations or governments.
Algonquians attacked the settlement in 1571, killing the missionaries and halting Spanish efforts at colonization in the region (Lewis and Loomie 1953).
Indeed, Algonquian terms were nearly as well represented as those of the Siouan suggesting that a significant remnant of the Algonquians, such as the Pochicks, were present on the reservation.