alkene

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alkene

(ăl`kēn), any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain one or more carbon-carbon double bonds (see chemical bondchemical bond,
mechanism whereby atoms combine to form molecules. There is a chemical bond between two atoms or groups of atoms when the forces acting between them are strong enough to lead to the formation of an aggregate with sufficient stability to be regarded as an
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). Alkenes with only one double bond have the general formula CnH2n. In the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) system of chemical nomenclature, the name of an alkene is derived from the name of the corresponding alkanealkane
, any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain only single bonds (see chemical bond). Alkanes have the general chemical formula CnH2n+2.
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 by replacing the -ane alkane suffix with -ene and, if necessary, adding a prefix to indicate the location of the double bond in the molecule. The IUPAC name of the simplest alkene, H2C=CH2, is ethene, which is derived from ethane. Propene is related to propane. Two alkenes, 1-butene and 2-butene, are related to butane; these two compounds, which differ in the location of the double bond in their molecules, are structural isomersisomer
, in chemistry, one of two or more compounds having the same molecular formula but different structures (arrangements of atoms in the molecule). Isomerism is the occurrence of such compounds. Isomerism was first recognized by J. J. Berzelius in 1827.
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. In addition to these IUPAC names, many of the alkenes have common names, e.g., ethene is called ethylene and propene propylene. The alkenes as a group are sometimes called the ethylene series. Since the carbon-carbon double bond is sometimes called an olefinic linkage, the alkenes are sometimes called the olefins. Many of the reactions in which alkenes take part involve the cleavage of half the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent formation of two single bonds, one to each of the adjacent carbon atoms. Such reactions include hydrogenation, with the formation of an alkane, and hydration, with the formation of an alcohol.

alkene

[′al‚kēn]
(organic chemistry)
One of a class of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons containing one or more carbon-to-carbon double bonds.

alkene

a. any unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon with the general formula CnH2n
b. (as modifier): alkene series
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the experimental results, it was found that no alkenes were generated in the oil components when the Curie-point temperature was below 386[degrees]C.
Branched alkenes plot between their straight-chain analogues and the pyrogenic SOM markers, supporting the hypothesis that these branched alkenes are associated with charred aliphatic precursors (Eckmeier and Wiesenberg 2009; Kaal and Rumpel 2009).
Calculated HSAB and experimental parameters for conjugated type-2 alkenes and nonconjugated analogs.
Already, LoPachin's group has developed just such a compound that, in Petri dishes at least, sops up type-2 alkenes and protects nerves from harm.
2005, " Epoxidation of Alkenes in The Presence of Molybdenum- Squarate Complexes as Novel Catalysts," Applied Catalysis A: General 281, pp 157-166.
Depending on the catalyst and operating conditions, the product liquid can contain alkanes, alkenes, and/or alcohols.
In the present work, we detail the modification of low molecular weight acrylics with species containing long chain alkenes and the use of the modified polymers in thermoset coatings.
0%) Aromatics, Alkanes, Alkenes, Ketones, Aldehydes Charcoal 33-38 >15 % of Ash (ZnO) Activated 3-5 % of Sulfur carbon
2]Et) resulted in formation of chiral alkenes 4a and 4b in an approximate 9:1 ratio with the desired Z-isomer, i.
Furthermore, for reduction, gold can hydrogenate alkenes, alkynes, imines and carbonyls in the presence of H2.
Within each length the compounds are ordered into functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, acids, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, esters (including lactones), and ethers.