Bloom, Allan David

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Bloom, Allan David

(1936–92) political scientist, author; born in Indianapolis, Ind. Educated at the University of Chicago, he joined the Chicago liberal arts faculty in 1955, moved on to Cornell and the University of Toronto (1963–79), and returned to Chicago in 1979 to teach political philosophy. He remained an obscure translator of Plato until the publication of his Closing of the American Mind (1987), a neoconservative polemic against what he perceived as the politicization of academia and the decline of liberal education in the Western tradition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allan Bloom, author of The Closing of the American Mind (1987), would be ashamed.
In "The Crisis of Liberal Education," Allan Bloom (disclosure: Bloom, whom Lazere attacks, was my teacher) argued that universities should preserve for students serious and neglected alternative accounts of the best way of life.
Among such heirs, no one is more prominent than Allan Bloom.
Twenty-five years later, Allan Bloom would mine a similar vein to produce his bestseller, The Closing of the American Mind.
WHENEVER it enters my mind, as it often does, the name of Allan Bloom evokes, first of all, a memory of laughter.
Allan Bloom, a classicist by training, explains in his introduction why he found it counterproductive for non-Western perspectives to get a place in liberal arts curriculum, by tracing the root of America's post-Vietnam malaise back to Rousseau (my italics):
Firstly, Cohen sets out to answer the charges of those like Allan Bloom and Ernst Cassirer who argue that Rousseau demands the social engineering of citizens.
with Notes and an Interpretive Essay, by Allan Bloom (New York: Basic Books, 1968), 421.
Using the critique of higher education offered by Allan Bloom, that relativism and sterile technicism have led to a "closing of the American mind," Earls asks us to join in Dewey's rejection of a "quest for certainty" and accept that we do indeed live in uncertainty, which does not mean we live without conviction and a responsibility for our own fate.
To cite a few examples, his novel Humboldt's Gift (1975) is a fictionalized but accurate portrait of his ill-fated poet friend Delmore Schwartz and his relationship with him and Ravelstein (2000) is a memoir of his friendship with professor of philosophy Allan Bloom.
Leavis, Northrop Frye, Jonathan Culler, Allan Bloom, Terence Eagleton, and innumerable others that make his failure to provide an index one of the book's few disappointments.