Allen Welsh Dulles

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Dulles, Allen Welsh

 

Born Apr. 7, 1893, in Water-town, N.Y., died Jan. 29, 1969, in Washington, D.C. American statesman.

Dulles was a lawyer by profession. Between 1916 and 1926 he was in the diplomatic service. Later, he became a partner in a large law firm—Sullivan and Cromwell. During 1942–45 he headed the US political intelligence system in Europe, and in 1947 he began work in the US Central Intelligence Agency. Dulles served as director of the CIA between 1953 and 1961. He was one of the organizers of extensive US intelligence work, espionage, and sabotage against the USSR, the other socialist countries, and the national liberation movement. Dulles, as director of the CIA, and his brother J. F. Dulles exerted a strong influence on the shaping of the US government’s anti-Soviet policy during the 1950’s.

References in periodicals archive ?
EX-CIA director Allen Dulles ordered JFK's assassination because he was a "threat to national security", a new book has claimed.
But Wilford has uncovered a wealth of detail about what CIA operatives did and how President Eisenhower and Foster and Allen Dulles supported them.
Ralph Bunche (the first African-American to win the Nobel Peace Prize), and four Directors of Central Intelligence: William Casey, William Colby, Allen Dulles, and Richard Helms.
The siblings depicted in Stephen Kinzer's The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War were nearly opposites.
In 1963, when Americans allowed CIA operators (including Cord Meyer, Allen Dulles, James Angleton, E.
For instance, Stephen Kinzer, author of he Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles and Their Secret World War began his talk by noting that his publisher did not want him there, since the library doesn't sell books.
The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War provides a biographical history and comes from an award-winning former foreign correspondent and author who reveals the nearly-forgotten history of two brothers who changed America.
But few today would think of John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles, two brothers who served, respectively, as secretary of state and director of the Central Intelligence Agency during the presidency of Dwight D.
But as Stephen Kinzer's sparkling new biography, The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, indicates, Dwight Eisenhower did embrace the idea of regime change abroad, and with a vengeance.
The documents and interviews also show US diplomat Allen Dulles leaned on Bond author Ian Fleming to paint the agency in a more positive light at a time when US filmmakers, authors and journalists were silent about the activities of the CIA, fearful to even mention it by name.
The documents and interviews also show US diplomat Allen Dulles leaned on Bond author Ian Fleming to paint the agency in a more positive light at a time when US film-makers, authors and journalists were silent about the activities of the CIA, fearful to even mention it by name.

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