Allende meteorite

Allende meteorite

[ai¦yen·de ′mēd·ē·ə‚rīt]
(geology)
A meteorite that fell in Mexico in 1969 and contains inclusions that have been radiometrically dated at 4.56 × 109 years, the oldest found so far, presumably indicating the time of formation of the first solid bodies in the solar system.
References in periodicals archive ?
A The oldest would be the Allende meteorite from Mexico which is 4.
More than 40 years later, the Allende meteorite is still serving the scientific community as a rich source of information about the early stages of our solar system's evolution.
The Allende meteorite is the largest carbonaceous chondrite, a diverse class of primitive meteorites, ever found on our planet and is considered by many the best-studied meteorite in history.
Most dramatic, in the Allende meteorite fullerenes, the ratio was several thousand times greater than in the atmosphere.
NASA researcher Luann Becker crushed a sample of the so-called Allende meteorite to reach her conclusion.
Matloff and his colleagues have been experimenting with red and green lasers to see how deeply they penetrate asteroidal rock, using solid and powdered (regolith) samples from the Allende meteorite that fell in Chihuahua, Mexico in 1969.
Matloff presented a paper on the results of the City Tech team's optical transmission experiments, "Optical Transmission of an Allende Meteorite Thin Section and Simulated Regolith," at the 73rd Annual Meeting of the international Meteoritical Society, held at the American Museum of Natural History and the Park Central Hotel in New York City.
He cites a piece of the famous Allende meteorite, "kindly provided to us by Dr.
Since the 1980s, researchers have puzzled over the origin of nanodiamonds, such as the Allende meteorite that landed in Mexico in 1969.