allotrope

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allotrope

any of two or more physical forms in which an element can exist

allotrope

[′a·lə‚trōp]
(chemistry)
A form of an element showing allotropy.

allotrope

A chemical element that can take on different forms based on the structure of, or the number of atoms in, the molecule. The most common example is carbon. If carbon atoms are bonded in a lattice of four triangular surfaces (tetrahedral), it is a diamond. If the atoms are bonded in sheets of six-sided (hexagonal) lattice, it is graphite. See isotope.
References in periodicals archive ?
27) Allotropes are one of two or more existing forms of an element.
This famous passage is not lost on Miller, especially given their shared interest in the censored "soot:" This passage's topic shows where Miller's extension and development from his predecessors is most apparent: "the old stable ego:" As with Lawrence, the stable ego is banished by Miller, and while we may allow for a constant libidinal current, its expression is an allotrope, and hence the allotropic self is subject to radical reorientation.
It can be viewed as the building block of all other graphitic carbon allotropes of different dimensionality (1).
He investigated the various allotropes of arsenic, sulphur, and phosphorus, and in 1891 discovered iron pentacarbonyl [8].
Quartz, zeolites, gemstones, perovskite type oxides, ferrite, carbon allotropes, complex coordinated compounds and many more -- all products now being produced using hydrothermal technology.
But it is part of Professor Nussbaum's brief--as, in a way, it was of Mill's--to encourage us to dispense with moral aversion, of which shame and disgust are prominent allotropes.
The first-place winner this year was Melanie Tomsons, Pasadena Academy, Pasadena, who wrote a critical study of the allotropes of carbon, while the second prize was awarded to Julie-Ann Mayo of Herdman Collegiate in Corner Brook.