allylamine

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allylamine

[¦al·əl·ə¦mēn]
(organic chemistry)
CH2CHCH2NH2 A yellow oil that is miscible with water; boils at 58°C; prepared from mustard oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report titled "Global Antifungal Therapeutics Market: Trends and Opportunities (2014-2019)" provides an in-depth analysis of global antifungal therapeutics market with focus on antifungal drug classes - Polyenes, Azoles, Echinocandins and Allylamines.
19) The allylamines are a relatively new class of antifungal agents that have a different mechanism of action compared with the azoles.
Allylamine derivatives: new class of synthetic antifungal agents inhibiting fungal squalene epoxidase.
Antifungal activity of allylamine derivative terbinafine in vitro.
GBI Research, the leading business intelligence provider has released its latest research Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth, which provides an insight into antifungals sales and price forecasts until 2017.
Alkylamines and allylamines are used as basic materials, predominantly in agro chemicals but also in rubber processing, water treatment chemicals, pharmaceuticals and others.
GBI Research, the leading business intelligence provider has released its latest research "Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth", which provides an insight into antifungals sales and price forecasts until 2017.
To order this report: Drug_and_Medication Industry : Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth
Drug and Medication Industry : Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth
The well-known fungicidal allylamines terbinafine and naftifine were each studied at 2% and 6% concentrations to determine the in vitro penetration and permeation through human cadaver nails.
Although currently the leading class of antifungals, these products will face stiff generic competition and will increasingly yield market share to allylamines and a host of emerging newer compounds and products from both established firms and small niche players.
Three presentations summarize experiments in the basic biology of fungal efflux pump inhibitors, their potential in vivo efficacy and the impact of efflux pump inhibitors on the susceptibility of clinical isolates to azoles and allylamines.