Alnaschar

Alnaschar

dreams of the wealth he will realize from the sale of his glassware. [Arab. Lit.: Benét, 26]
See: Fantasy
References in classic literature ?
As long as our father lived Alnaschar was very idle.
This basket," said Alnaschar to himself, "has cost me a hundred drachmas-- all that I possess in the world.
His voice and manner were so terrific that Alnaschar had not strength to reply, and allowed his gold to be taken from him, and even sabre cuts to be inflicted on him without making any resistance.
Alnaschar rose too, and drawing the sabre from under his dress dealt the black such a blow on his neck that his head was severed from his body.
She led Alnaschar into a chamber filled with coffers packed with gold, which he gazed at with an admiration he was powerless to conceal.
Unluckily, on leaving the house, he forgot to lock the door, and the neighbours, finding the place empty, informed the police, who next morning arrested Alnaschar as a thief.
Sir," replied Alnaschar, "I am ready to tell you the whole story, but give, I pray you, your word, that I shall run no risk of punishment.
The judge, however, would say nothing about this, and lost no time in sending men to fetch away all that Alnaschar had taken from the house.