Alp Arslan


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Alp Arslan

(älp ärslän`), 1029–72, Seljuk sultan of Persia (1063–72). In 1065 he led the Seljuks in an invasion of Armenia and Georgia and in 1066 attacked the Byzantine Empire. The success of his campaign was crowned (1071) by his brilliant victory over Romanus IV at ManzikertManzikert
, Turk. Malazgirt, village, E Turkey, SE of Erzurum. It was an important town of ancient Armenia. A council held there in A.D. 726 reasserted the independence of the Armenian Church from the Orthodox Eastern Church.
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. After defeating the Byzantines, he wrested Syria from the Fatimids. In Dec., 1072, while campaigning beyond the Oxus River (Amu Darya), he was murdered by one of his captives. He was succeeded by his son MalikshahMalikshah
, 1055–92, third sultan of the Seljuks (see Turks). In 1072 he succeeded his father to head an empire that controlled parts of Arabia, Mesopotamia, and areas near the Persian Gulf. His rule was aided by the powerful vizier, Nizam al-Mulk.
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, who consolidated the victories his father had won.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mohammed bin Dawood, the Seljuq ruler, who had earned the Turkish title, Alp Arslan (courageous lion), was the figure behind that.
The project also includes information about the Seljuk sultans from Alp Arslan, Malik Shah and Sultan Sanjar and the Seljuk architects Mohammed bin Atsyz, Keluk bin Abdullah, HE-rrem Shah of Ahlat, Makki the son of Hji Birti, Kerimuddin Erdi Shah, Abdulgaffar and Mohammed the son of Havlan of Damascus.
Their leader, Alp Arslan, is at once khan, sultan of the Sunni world, exemplary mujahid, the conqueror of the Byzantine emperor, and the prototype for Ottoman sultans.
Alp Arslan was not anxious for conflict with Byzantium.
Accordingly, Alp Arslan led his outnumbered forces into battle just as the Muslim community was praying in unison for his victory, a theme first highlighted by Ibn al-Jawzi, who reports that the Saljuq Sultan addressed his troops, saying "I am only one of you and a ghazi with you" (p.
Alp Arslan then magnanimously released Romanus, who agreed to pay a huge sum, annual tribute, gifts, free "every prisoner in Byzantium," and provide troops when called upon.
Neither Alp Arslan, who soon departed for Central Asia (where he was killed), nor his son and heir, Malikshah, did anything to follow up on the victory.
Retrospectively, he depicts Alp Arslan as preparing the stage for the conquest of Anatolia and assigning commanders to various cities (pp.
160), which portray the later beylik dynasties as ghazis in the jihad tradition of Alp Arslan.
Among them are the protocol on cooperation in the search for the burial of Sultan Alp Arslan and construction of his mausoleum and a Protocol on cooperation in restoration of the mausoleums of Sahabalar Hakam al-Ghifri and Bureida Al-Aslami.
The religious policy of the early Seljuq empire is characterized in just one sentence which says simply that many schools were opened under the reign of Nizam al-Mulk and Alp Arslan (p.
Ishaq al-Tusi, better known as Nizam al-ME-lk, who, with his vast experience and wisdom, served as the vizier of Seljuk sultans, Alp Arslan and Malik Shah, in the late 11th century, which was filled with more complicated and chaotic events compared to our time.