Alp Arslan


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Alp Arslan

(älp ärslän`), 1029–72, Seljuk sultan of Persia (1063–72). In 1065 he led the Seljuks in an invasion of Armenia and Georgia and in 1066 attacked the Byzantine Empire. The success of his campaign was crowned (1071) by his brilliant victory over Romanus IV at ManzikertManzikert
, Turk. Malazgirt, village, E Turkey, SE of Erzurum. It was an important town of ancient Armenia. A council held there in A.D. 726 reasserted the independence of the Armenian Church from the Orthodox Eastern Church.
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. After defeating the Byzantines, he wrested Syria from the Fatimids. In Dec., 1072, while campaigning beyond the Oxus River (Amu Darya), he was murdered by one of his captives. He was succeeded by his son MalikshahMalikshah
, 1055–92, third sultan of the Seljuks (see Turks). In 1072 he succeeded his father to head an empire that controlled parts of Arabia, Mesopotamia, and areas near the Persian Gulf. His rule was aided by the powerful vizier, Nizam al-Mulk.
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, who consolidated the victories his father had won.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the time of Alp Arslan, the great Seljuk king, an Ahal-Teke brought its seriously wounded and unconscious rider back to the base, traveling some 200 km.
A team of three final year students Taihami Tariq, MubarizZaffar and Muhammad Alp Arslan have won the South Asia Triple Helix Association (SATHA) Innovation award for their FYP project Di-Nero.
Mohammed bin Dawood, the Seljuq ruler, who had earned the Turkish title, Alp Arslan (courageous lion), was the figure behind that.
The project also includes information about the Seljuk sultans from Alp Arslan, Malik Shah and Sultan Sanjar and the Seljuk architects Mohammed bin Atsyz, Keluk bin Abdullah, HE-rrem Shah of Ahlat, Makki the son of Hji Birti, Kerimuddin Erdi Shah, Abdulgaffar and Mohammed the son of Havlan of Damascus.
Their leader, Alp Arslan, is at once khan, sultan of the Sunni world, exemplary mujahid, the conqueror of the Byzantine emperor, and the prototype for Ottoman sultans.
In the course of time the historian became administrator of affairs during the sultanate of Sultan Alp Arslan.
This was equally true under the sultanates of the Selucid Turks of the 10th and 11th centuries (Togril Beg, Alp Arslan and Malik Shah, with the decisive vizier Nizam al-Mulk), or under Ulugh Beg, a member of the Timurid dynasty (descended from Tamerlane).
Among them are the protocol on cooperation in the search for the burial of Sultan Alp Arslan and construction of his mausoleum and a Protocol on cooperation in restoration of the mausoleums of Sahabalar Hakam al-Ghifri and Bureida Al-Aslami.
The religious policy of the early Seljuq empire is characterized in just one sentence which says simply that many schools were opened under the reign of Nizam al-Mulk and Alp Arslan (p.
Ishaq al-Tusi, better known as Nizam al-ME-lk, who, with his vast experience and wisdom, served as the vizier of Seljuk sultans, Alp Arslan and Malik Shah, in the late 11th century, which was filled with more complicated and chaotic events compared to our time.
Birth date unknown, but Romanus was descended from an old family of the military aristocracy in Cappadocia (central Turkey); first came to prominence while fighting the Petchenegs during the reign of Constantine IX Ducas (1042-1054), establishing a reputation as a loyal and able soldier; proclaimed emperor by the court faction of Michael Psellus and Empress Eudocia, widow of Constantine IX, in response to the disintegrating military situation and the demands of the opposition for effective leadership (January 1, 1068); Romanus hurriedly raised an army, composed largely of mercenaries (Petchenegs, Uzes, Normans, and so forth), and took the field against the Seljuk Turks under Alp Arslan that winter; he defeated Alp at Sebastia (December?
Birth date unknown, but was the son of Malik Shah and grandson of Alp Arslan, founder of the Seljuk Turkish state; governor of Antioch and its environs when the Crusaders attacked that city on their way to the Holy Land (October 21, 1097), he directed the city's defense with skill and energy until the Crusaders breached the city walls (early May 1098), and then held out in the citadel on Mount Silpius to the southeast of the city proper, when he was killed by an Armenian as he tried to slip through the Crusader lines (June 3).