Altneuland

Altneuland

Theodore Herzl’s imaginative description of the future Zionist settlement in Palestine. [Jewish Hist.: Collier’s, XIX, 79]
See: Judaism

Altneuland

future Jewish state; “if willed, no fairytale.” [Hung. Lit.: Altneuland, Wigoder, 21]
See: Utopia
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In his novel Altneuland Herzl had painted the idyllic existence of one single happy Arab among the hospitable Jews.
Our discussion is drawn from sources in Herzl's own writings: In the Matter of the Jews, The Jewish State, and Altneuland, and aimed to explore the realization of Herzl's ideas, as expressed in the State of Israel 62 years after Independence, and to seek answers to the question of what still remains to be achieved and the nature of the Zionist vision for the next 150 years.
Theodor Herzl's 1902 novel Altneuland (Old-New Land) envisioned a democratic New Society in Palestine.
In Altneuland, Herzl himself imagined a future state where a proud Ottoman Muslim called Rashid Bey would embrace the Zionist enterprise and join his Jewish friends on sightseeing tours.
A radical revision of Herzl's Altneuland, these pages are set in the year 2023 and describe the now-aged author's return to Israel after a hiatus of 3O years.
In his novel Altneuland, Theodor Herzl, the father of modern Zionism, had himself forecast that economic prosperity--just as Cahan later argued and, most recently, Shimon Peres maintains--would be the solution to overcoming any lingering animosity among the Arabs toward the Jewish presence.
The very title of the Utopian novel Altneuland, or "The Old New Land," by Theodor Herzl, the founder of political Zionism, captures some of these existential paradoxes.
Herzl's novel, Altneuland, is not simply utopian, rather "it is a utopian colonial novel" (37).
Jacqueline Rose uses Scholem's notion to interpret the historical trajectory of Zionism from the writing of Herzl's utopian novel Altneuland (1902) up to the foundation of the state of Israel as "Jewish state" in Palestine (1948) and the current situation of occupation and progressive destruction of Palestinian society.
The Jewish state's founding documents, equivalent to The Federalist Papers and The Declaration of Independence taken together, are Herzl's Judenstaae An Attempt at a Modern Solution of the Jewish Quest/on, a pamphlet he published in 1896, and the visionary Altneuland, In Judenstaat, he argued that the only solution to antisemitism would be for Jews, a separate people, to gain sovereignty over a land large enough for them to actualize their nationalistic strivings.
This explains his sharp opposition to Herzl at the First Zionist Congress, which intensified with the publication of Altneuland in late 1902.
Remarkably, and apparently without any knowledge of Blyden, Herzl in his 1902 novel, Altneuland, has Zionist Professor Steineck remark: "Now, that I have lived to see the return of the Jews, I wish I could help to prepare the return of the Negroes.