Alypius

Alypius

or

Alypios

(both: əlĭp`ēəs), fl. c.360, Greek author of Introduction to Music, chief source of modern knowledge of Greek musical notation.
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In Confessions 6, Augustine diagnoses this condition in his friend Alypius, who "falls" tragically because he cannot give up gazing on the spectacle of violence at gladiator shows.
After halting, Augustine "hurried back to the place where Alypius was sitting.
Of course, Augustine's giving the text to Alypius is already foreshadowed by the prior gospel reading by Antony--a reading Augustine now hears--now authentically recalls as a gift.
Here we learn that Alypius was a student of Augustine.
In the process he insensitively makes use of the example of those drawn to the circus unmindful of how such a caustic reference to the topic might poorly affect Alypius sitting in the lecture room.
A good Christian, Alypius wanted nothing to do with the violent spectacles and refused to attend.
He grew up in Grangetown where his father Alypius ran a printing works.
188 is from both Augustine and Alypius, supporter of Augustine and bishop of Thagaste, emphasizing the institutional grounding of Augustine's rhetoric: this is an epistle of ecclesiastical import, not merely a letter of ascetic counsel.
shows the role of reading in Augustine's own conversion and in the conversions of others he reports, such as those of Alypius, Victorinus, and Ponticianus, and the role of reading during his retreat at Cassiciacum in his prayerful recitation of the Psalms, as well as the transcendence of all spoken and written words in the vision of the life to come shared with Monica at Ostia.
The band features Robert Wadlow, the world's tallest man on the double bass, Alypius the Egyptian Dwarf in a birdcage playing trumpet, and Italian Francisco Lentini, the three legged man on banjo.
s book is likely to be widely read and deservedly influential, namely, his statement that Monnica was baptized along with Augustine, Adeodatus, and Alypius in 387.
The commentary contains but five excursuses: on mothers and fathers in the Confessions; on the liberales disciplinae; on Alypius, Paulinus, and the genesis of the Confessions; on Psalm 4; and on memory in Augustine.