Amalasuntha


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Amalasuntha

(ă'mələsŭn`thə), d. 535, Ostrogothic queen in Italy (534–35), daughter of Theodoric the GreatTheodoric the Great,
c.454–526, king of the Ostrogoths and conqueror of Italy, b. Pannonia. He spent part of his youth as a hostage in Constantinople. Elected king in 471 after his father's death, he became involved in intrigues in which he was by turns the ally and the
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. After her father's death (526) she was regent for her son Athalaric. He died in 534, and she and her husband, Theodahad, became joint rulers of Italy. Her friendly relations with the Byzantine emperor Justinian I alienated her people. In 535 the Ostrogoths revolted; Amalasuntha was exiled and later murdered by order of her husband. Justinian used her murder as his pretext for attacking and reconquering Italy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amalasuntha es un nombre bitematico cuyo primer radical expresa la procedencia dinastica y el segundo --swinps quiere decir 'fuerte'.
Al ser hija de Amalasuntha y Eutarico, era amala por doble via, la paterna y la materna.
Wharton plays with this convention: she has Pauline congratulate herself on her tolerance in courting the attentions of the Cardinal and her generous support to the Catholic Amalasuntha, but this facade of open-mindedness does not need to be scratched very deeply before 'the old Puritan terror of gliding priests and incense and idolatry rise to the surface' (p.
After all, poor Amalasuntha has good American blood in her [.
Yet Connor never mentions Procopius's blaming Theodora for the murder of the Ostrogoth queen Amalasuntha, whom he praises for her extraordinary strength (Secret History 16.
Like "exhausted" Italian aristocrats (including Amalasuntha, a Wyant relation), Arthur is born without the ability to "manage his own poor little concerns with any sort of common sense or consistency" (32).
His own career, Pauline's multiple activities, the problem of poor Arthur Wyant, Nona, Jim, Lita Wyant, the Mahatma, the tiresome Grant Lindons, the perennial and inevitable Amalasuntha, for whom the house was being illuminated tonight--all were strands woven into the very pile of carpet he trod on his way up the stairs.