Amaryllidaceae

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Amaryllidaceae

[‚a·mə‚ri·lə′dā·sē‚ē]
(botany)
The former designation for a family of plants now included in the Liliaceae.

Amaryllidaceae

 

a family of monocotyledonous plants, comprising perennial herbs with bulbs and less commonly with rhizomes or corms. They have large monoecious actinomorphic flowers or slightly zygomorphic flowers, usually arranged in an umbel with a spathe. In the flower is a corollalike perianth, usually gamophyllous or free, often with an appendage. The ovary is inferior, and in this the Amaryllidaceae differs from the related family Liliaceae. About 75 genera and 1,000 species are found around the world. Amaryllids are especially abundant in Cape Province (South Africa) and Central and South America. Seven genera with 30 species grow in the USSR. Many genera—for example, Narcissus, Amaryllis, Crinum, Hippeastrum, and Clivia—are cultivated as ornamental plants, and others are used in medicine because they contain alkaloids.

References in periodicals archive ?
Haemanthamine and haemanthidine are Amaryllidaceae alkaloids originally derived from 5,10-[beta]-ethanophenanthridine.
Chemical and biological aspects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.
Amaryllidaceae alkaloids represent a kind of phenylalanine and tyrosine derivates restricted to Amarylidaceae family only.
Application of the [beta]-azidonation reaction to the enantioselective synthesis of the lycorane Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.
A study of the fragmentation of some Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.
13)C Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of amaryllidaceae alkaloids.
Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and Narcissus extracts.