Ambrose

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Related to Ambrose of Milan: Saint Ambrose

Ambrose

Saint. ?340--397 ad, bishop of Milan; built up the secular power of the early Christian Church; also wrote music and Latin hymns. Feast day: Dec. 7 or April 4
1. Curtly ('k3:tlI). born 1963, Antiguan cricketer; played for the West Indies 1987--2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Barnes, "The Election of Ambrose of Milan," Episcopal Elections in Late Antiquity, J.
14) Basil's approach to the arts influenced the Latin Fathers: Saint Ambrose of Milan cited the above quoted passage almost verbatim in his own Hexaemeron and Saint Augustine recalled it in his De doctrina Christiana.
In recent years, the writings of Ambrose of Milan have received a revival of scholarly interest.
Concerning the first task, working groups were given an excerpt from Ambrose of Milan (fourth century CE), Gregory the Theologian (fourth century CE) or Isaac of Ninevah (seventh century CE).
through Augustine's City of God, Ambrose of Milan and Patrick of Ireland.
Saint Ambrose of Milan refuses the emperor Theodosius I admittance to a church.
Great theologians, such as Ambrose of Milan, Augustine and Chrysostom, composed hymns to combat the heresies of their time, using music to convey their message.
Particularly important to the anti-Nicene defeat was the strong and effective resistance provided by Archbishop Ambrose of Milan.
Ambrose of Milan, Bernard of Clairvaux, Modomnoc, and Valentine of Rome are all official patron saints of Apis mellifera--the species of bees domesticated for the honey they produce.
I begin by surveying the history of the father-son analogy in Latin Pro-Nicene thought, looking first at Phoebadius of Agen, who represents a traditional Latin response to the Homoians, then turning to Hilary of Poitiers, who first accepts the "name" motif and then gradually abandons it, and ending with Ambrose of Milan, who represents the transition between Hilary and Augustine.
Let me find you in love, and love you in finding,"--attributed to Ambrose of Milan, c.
78) Both these analyses come into play ill the seminal work of Hans von Campenhausen, Ambrosius yon Mailand als Kirchenpolitiker (Berlin: De Gruyter, 1929), 189-222; a similarly political, if revisionist, analysis is found in McLynn, Ambrose of Milan, 170-219.