Amenhotep II


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Amenhotep II

(ä'mĕnhō`tĕp, ā'–) or

Amenophis II

(ă'mĕnō`fĭs), d. c.1420 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Thutmose IIIThutmose III
or Thothmes III
, d. 1436 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; the successor of Thutmose II. After the death of Thutmose II, his wife Hatshepsut became regent for Thutmose III and relegated him to an inferior position for 22 years while she
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. Amenhotep II succeeded (1448 B.C.) as coregent and later ruled alone for 26 years. There are records of his prowess in hunting and horsemanship. He put down a revolt in Syria and maintained his father's conquests. His tomb is at Thebes; he also built extensively at Karnak. He was succeeded by his son Thutmose IVThutmose IV
or Thothmes IV
, reigned c.1406–1398 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty, son and successor of Amenhotep II. He invaded Asia and Nubia, and formed alliances with independent kings neighboring his Syrian tributaries.
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References in periodicals archive ?
where Munro opts for a date in the time-span from Hatshepsut/Thutmosis III to Amenhotep II (Luiselli ascribes the papyrus exclusively to the time of Amenhotep II).
When Amenhotep II in his seventh year was in the vicinity with his army, the prince of Qids came to him in submission.
8, a slight error appears: with reference to the Annals of Amenemhat II from Memphis, two references to Amenhotep II are given.
Bryan's chapter two is considerably more complex in its attempt to cover both the reigns of Amenhotep II and Thutmose IV and to trace internal and external developments relating to Egypt's transition from a military machine to a powerful state enjoying generally peaceful relations with her neighbors and prosperity at home.
Six of twelve faience bricks inscribed on one face for Amenhotep II (1427-1400 B.
Both concerts will take place at the foot of the Sphinx next to Amenhotep II Temple in Giza.
The mummy was discovered by a Japanese team who was also digging in Luxor, home to large temple complexes built by Amenhotep II and then Ramses II.
A stratigraphic series at Tell el-Daba (ancient Avaris and Peru-nefer) covering the period from the beginning of the Twelfth Dynasty to the reign of Amenhotep II (c.
In early January, Italian scientists excavating under the mortuary temple of Pharaoh Amenhotep II came across a collection of tombs hiding human bones, the remains of wooden sarcophagi, and jars used many centuries ago to store the organs of the deceased.
According to Egypt's Antiques Ministry, the tombs were discovered under the mortuary temple of the Pharaoh Amenhotep II, located on the Western Bank of the River Nile.
The vase, which belonged to Amenhotep II, who ruled from 1498-1387BC, is in Cairo Museum.
While Junge assigns Astarte to the reign of Horemheb, Phillipe Collombert and Laurent Coulon have recently redated it to Amenhotep II ("Les dieux contre la mer: Le debut du 'papyrus d'Astarte [Pbn 202)],"BIFAO 100 [2000]: 193-242); similarly, while Junge places Wenamun in the reign of Ramesses XI, John Baines would push it into Dynasty 21 ("On Wenamun as a Literary Text," in Literatur und Politik im pharaonischen und ptolemaischen Agypten, ed.