American Geographical Society


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American Geographical Society

(AGS), oldest geographical society in the United States, founded 1852 in New York City. Its purpose is to advance the science of geography through discussion and publication. The society maintains its collection in the library at the Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Its archives contain many rare maps and globes, historic letters, and artifacts from explorations. Formerly noted for its support of scientific research and exploration, for its research facilities (extensively used by the federal government during the 1919 Paris Peace Conference and again during World War II), and for its cartographic work, the society's work has become chiefly educational and informational. The Geographical Review is its quarterly journal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hubbard's note-book, containing his maps and other records, [which] I have not had access to"; see Bulletin of the American Geographical Society 38, no.
1907-08): 554-61; "Labrador, From Lake Melville to Ungava Bay," Bulletin of the American Geographical Society 38, no.
The fact that the description of Hubbard's campbed, including the hot-water bottle, is not mentioned in the Bulletin of the American Geographical Society ("Labrador, From Lake Melville to Ungava Bay"), but does appear in considerable detail in the article published in The EnglishWoman's Review ("Through Lonely Labrador" 84), suggests that while comfort is extraneous to the discourse of exploration, it is essential to the discourse of femininity.
Here, we examine these issues in the context of the American Geographical Society Library (AGSL) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) during the period 2000-05, when we held positions there as digital spatial data librarians.
Patti Day was responsible for the development of the digital spatial data clearinghouse at the American Geographical Society Library, where she served as the digital spatial data librarian for seven years.
She worked as an intern at the American Geographical Society (AGS) Library between 2002 and 2004 and then as an interim GIS librarian at the AGS Library between 2004 and 2005.
During the early months of the war, the American Geographical Society continued its work more or less as normal, but things changed dramatically after the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917.
Although the hopes of the American delegation in Paris were quickly dashed, the casualty of European "realpolitik" and the mounting opposition to Wilsonian internationalism in the United States, the story of the American Geographical Society and the Inquiry provides a different perspective on the role of geographical knowledge in wartime.
Mezes College of the City Chief Territorial Isaiah Bowman of New York Specialist American Geographical Society Regional Specialists Franco-German border Charles Haskins Harvard University Poland and Russia R.

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