Victorian architecture

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Victorian architecture

A term that encompasses a number of ornate and highly decorative architectural styles, such as High Victorian Italianate, Shingle, Victorian Romanesque, Gingerbread, Queen Anne, and Gothic Revival.

Victorian architecture

1. The Revival and Eclectic architecture in 19th century Great Britain, named after the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901); also its American counterpart. Many architectural historians avoid the term Victorian architecture, considering the adjective “Victorian” merely as descriptive of an age that encompassed a number of specific exuberant, ornate, and highly decorative architectural styles.
2. A loose term that sometimes covers three picturesque phases of architecture in America: Early Victorian (1840–1860), High Victorian (1860–1880), and Late Victorian (1880– 1890) and beyond; the adjective “Victorian” is descriptive of an age that encompassed a number of specific exuberant, ornate, and highly decorative architectural styles, such as High Victorian Italianate (1860–1885), High Victorian Gothic (1860–1890), Second Empire style (1855– 1890), Stick style (1860–1885), Shingle style (1880–1890), Victorian Romanesque (1870– 1900), Gingerbread Folk architecture (1870– 1910), and Queen Anne style (1870–1910). The adjectives Victorian or High Victorian are sometimes applied to Gothic Revival and Italianate style to indicate their later, more detailed, and more elaborate phases.
References in periodicals archive ?
As in the American Victorian advice literature these examples of children overcoming fear related invariably to boys.
These warnings, which resemble the ones in American Victorian family manuals, were reprinted unchanged until the last edition of the popular handbook, published in 1908.
The second characteristic of the American Victorian family manuals with regard to childhood fears, observed by Stearns and Haggerty--the insistence of parental advisors to avoid the use of fear in discipline--does not hold true for the Dutch counterparts.
What attention to the American Victorian moment can do, in other words, is nothing less than transform current notions of literary criticism by transforming the notions of genre on which modern criticism on both sides of the Atlantic continues to depend.
97), Loeffelholz locates the imperialist range of American Victorian poetry in Stedman's own poetry-specifically, in "The Carib Sea," a sequence of fifteen poems on Stedman's 1892 Caribbean tour, and "Ariel," a poem for Shelley that Stedman wrote on his way back from the Caribbean.
The Haggerty family, in contrast (Annie's father was a doctor) "were very typical American Victorians - to get your name in the paper was very unseemly.

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