Loyalty Day

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Loyalty Day

May 1
The U.S. Veterans of Foreign Wars designated the first day of May as Loyalty Day in 1947. The intention was to direct attention away from the Communist Party in the United States, which was using U.S. May Day rallies to promote its doctrines and sign up new members. The idea caught on, and soon Loyalty Day was being celebrated throughout the country with parades, school programs, patriotic exercises, and speeches on the importance of showing loyalty to the United States. In Delaware, for example, Loyalty Day was marked by a special ceremony at Cooch's Bridge, where the Stars and Stripes were first displayed in battle. And in New York City, the Loyalty Day parade routinely attracted tens of thousands of participants.
Dissent over American intervention in Vietnam eventually eroded the popularity of Loyalty Day, and in 1968 only a few thousand marchers turned out for the traditional parades in Manhattan and Brooklyn, while 87,000 people participated in the Vietnam peace march in Central Park. Loyalty Day was later replaced by Law Day.
SOURCES:
AmerBkDays-2000, p. 337
AnnivHol-2000, p. 74
References in periodicals archive ?
Loyalty Day began as Americanization Day in 1921 to counter the Communist Party's May 1 celebration of the Russian Revolution.
On July 4, 1915, about 150 cities across the country took part in a National Americanization Day promoted and coordinated by Kellor.